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History & Social Studies

Game-Based Learning in the Social Studies Classroom

Games are a great way to engage students, and when thoughtfully constructed, can provide teachers an invaluable look into what students know and how they think, strategize, and problem-solve. All the while, students might be having too much fun to even realize just how much they're learning. Games can be used for any subject or grade level, but these resources are targeted for the secondary social studies classroom.
A Collection By Sarah Bradstreet
  • 6 Collection Items
  • 6 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Game-Based Learning in the Social Studies Classroom
  • mashable.com
    mashable.com

    How a High School Teacher Is 'Gamifying' World News

    6 minute read
    Sarah Bradstreet says:
    Another gaming success story: a ninth grade social studies teacher got his students interested in current events by creating a game. He describes his game, called Fantasy Geopolitics, as a mixture between fantasy football and Model United Nations.
  • iCivics

    Webtool
    icivics.org
    icivics.org
    Sarah Bradstreet says:
    iCivics is great for civics or U.S. history classrooms. It contains lots of online games that teach about how the government works. Some of the games even allow students to simulate political experiences like running for president. For teachers, the site also contains lots of lesson plans and resources, including DBQs and WebQuests.
  • edutopia.org
    edutopia.org

    Historia: Game-Based Learning for Middle School History

    5 minute read
    Sarah Bradstreet says:
    A great companion to the above article, this one is written by one of the creators of Historia and describes its actual gameplay. It also includes video that shows the game in action with middle school students and links to files containing the games' guidebook, accompanying worksheets, and PowerPoint for the teacher to introduce its gameplay.
  • theatlantic.com
    theatlantic.com

    Designing a Classroom Game That Can Get Kids Excited About History

    5 minute read
    Sarah Bradstreet says:
    Two middle school social studies teachers completely revolutionized their classrooms through gameplay. Tired of traditional methods, they designed their own game, called Historia, which led to substantial increases in student engagement, achievement, and critical thinking. This article is a fascinating look into the process that went into creating this game.
  • edutopia.org
    edutopia.org

    Using Games for Assessment

    8 minute read
    Sarah Bradstreet says:
    Many teachers who consider using games in the classroom have one big question: "How do I actually assess learning through a game?" The article gives strategies for assessment during and after a game and provides real-life examples from teachers who have done it successfully. The article is also accompanied by a 3-minute "tutorial" video that gives a great overview of games as assessment tools.
  • edutopia.org
    edutopia.org

    "Rolling Out" a Game

    8 minute read
    Sarah Bradstreet says:
    First impressions are everything! How you introduce a new game in the classroom can make all the difference in how successful it will be. This article and accompanying video give great ideas for how to effectively introduce a game so that students learn how to play quickly before they lose interest.
BloomBoard SparkOther Cross-Curricular
BloomBoard Asks:Have you ever used games in your social studies classes? What worked and didn't work?