High School
Health

The Lowdown on Illegal Highs

In a world where illegal drugs are becoming not only more accessible, but more acceptable, it's important we equip our teens with the knowledge and skills to keep themselves safe. This collection provides you with facts as well as teaching strategies.
A Collection By Amy Watson
  • 7 Collection Items
  • 7 Collection Items
  • Discussion
The Lowdown on Illegal Highs
  • alcoholanddrugabuse.com
    alcoholanddrugabuse.com

    Safety First: A Reality-Based Approach to Teens, Drugs, and Drug Education

    10 minute read
    Amy Watson says:
    As more and more young people experiment with drugs it's important to find a realistic approach when teaching. 'Just say no' has become a little dated, instead we need to find a happy medium. This article offers ideas on how to be realistic when it comes to drug education.
  • Amy Watson says:
    The National Institute on Drug Abuse offers factual information on drug use, interactive activities and an abundance of resources for teachers, including downloadable lessons.
  • Amy Watson says:
    Here is a ready made workbook to give to your pupils outlining all the factual information about a wide range of illegal drugs.
  • Amy Watson says:
    This British documentary provides young people with the reality of taking drugs, from the euphoric highs to the lows. I suggest watching in advance and making sure you are aware of your pupils backgrounds as some scenes may be distressing, particularly if any of them have had experience with drug users.
  • Amy Watson says:
    Ethan Nadelmann offers intriguing insight on why we should turn our focus away from the problems of drug trafficking and instead channel our energy on regulation. As a teacher, his message at 14.00 is a key mantra for modern drug education and highlights the simple fact that all we want is for our teens to come home safe at the end of the night.
  • Amy Watson says:
    Fact sheets, booklets, DVDs, current news...you name it, this site has it. It's so easy to navigate and allows you to pick and choose the information you want to get across to your students.
  • Amy Watson says:
    The harm minimization approach to drug education is just that - minimizing harm. It takes the idea that many teens will, at some point, either try drugs themselves or be around those who do. As educators we must teach them how to act safely and make their own informed decisions, as well as knowing what to do should an unsafe situation arise. It's all about keeping our young ones safe and allowing them to develop into responsible adults.
BloomBoard SparkOther Cross-Curricular
BloomBoard Asks:What is the biggest drug threat that teenagers face these days?