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English Language Arts

Using Comics to Teach Inferences

Teachers understand the value of incorporating a variety of teaching methods in their classroom in order to explain a new skill to students. Comics are an effective visual teaching tool that can encourage inferential thinking in students. This collection of resources explains the value of using comics as an inferential teaching tool and provides concrete examples of how to do so.
A Collection By Sarah Bradstreet
  • 5 Collection Items
  • 5 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Using Comics to Teach Inferences
  • Sarah Bradstreet says:
    This blog post details an inferencing project/5-day lesson for fourth graders. The author provides examples of student work from each stage in the project. This inferencing project incorporates differentiated instruction and even calls for students to create their own comics strips. Other skills and topics are also addressed in these lessons, including setting and characterization.
  • Sarah Bradstreet says:
    Even Garfield can be educational! This free PowerPoint presentation is designed as a mini lesson or a short, daily activity (bell ringer, warm-up, journal activity or discussion) for teachers to incorporate into their classrooms. Created by a classroom teacher, it uses Garfield comics to help students understand inferences.
  • Sarah Bradstreet says:
    The teacher in this video explains step-by-step exactly how to teach inferences by using comics. She provides two clear examples, along with the exact wording and methods she uses to teach inferences with comics to students.
  • readingwithpictures.org
    readingwithpictures.org

    Why Teach with Comics?

    8 minute read
    Sarah Bradstreet says:
    Jennifer Haines explains the powerful benefits of using comics as a teaching tool, backing up her claims with research. She explains that comics are especially beneficial for reluctant and ELL readers. The use of comics to teach reading skills is a great motivating factor for these students.
  • Sarah Bradstreet says:
    Nancy Frey and Douglas B. Fisher, both professors at the University of San Diego’s Department of Educational Leadership, have put together this great book. Teaching Visual Literacy is a collection of articles intended to help teachers understand how to use visual material, including comics and cartoons, to help students think critically and thoughtfully.
BloomBoard SparkOther Cross-Curricular
BloomBoard Asks:What other skills can be taught using comics?