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Using Exaggeration to Teach ELLs in Grades 1-5

Gross exaggeration and hyperbole can be a fun way for English Language Learners (ELLs) to practice language comprehension and statement discrimination skills. Students in grades 1-5, in particular, are especially fond of exaggeration, hyperbole, and tall tales, and this collection offers plenty of examples as well as teaching strategies. Interpreting the exaggeration is part of the humor that kids are keen to understand.
A Collection By Debi Christensen
  • 8 Collection Items
  • 8 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Using Exaggeration to Teach ELLs in Grades 1-5
  • Debi Christensen says:
    Sometimes having a lesson plan to see how the instructional process works, from beginning to end, can be helpful. This particular plan takes students beyond the classroom and into print media to find authentic examples of exaggeration.
  • Debi Christensen says:
    Use this resource to teach caricatures (see p. 31), the ultimate physical exaggeration. Students enjoy visualizing characters’ physical description and enjoy the chance to practice their exaggeration skills through exaggeration. Best of all, this lesson works with any tall tale you are using in class, so you are not bound to a particular piece of literature.
  • Debi Christensen says:
    I like this resource because the worksheets are visually pleasing and contain excellent tall tales that kids will enjoy; sometimes this is a difficult combination to find! Use these worksheets as a supplement to lessons about using exaggeration.
  • Debi Christensen says:
    This resource works well for older students, especially if they are working art the 3rd, 4th, or 5th-grade levels, giving a couple example of poems with hyperbole. I like the idea of getting students involved in creating their own examples of hyperbole, and what better way than to play with hyperbole?
  • Debi Christensen says:
    Use this short, funny video to further the use of hyperbole and exaggeration. The computer generated voices add to the humor. While there are considerable examples of exaggeration, this video can also be used to teach about bullying.
  • teachingkidsbooks.com
    teachingkidsbooks.com

    Exaggeration/Tall Tales

    5 minute read
    Debi Christensen says:
    This list of sixteen more picture book tales of exaggeration is a good resource for creating a thematic reading center or providing more examples of exaggeration. Although some of the titles were published long ago, they never go out of favor with students.
  • Debi Christensen says:
    Beginning a lesson with a children’s picture book is one of my favorite ways to get students involved in the lesson right away, and this book provides the right kind of exaggeration and hyperbole to get kids thinking and laughing as you begin a powerful unit with strong implications for learning language.
  • Debi Christensen says:
    Examples, the introduction to hyperbole, and specific classroom activities can be found in this one article. Author Janovsky recommends showing examples of hyperbole or exaggeration and discussing them before having students create their own.
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BloomBoard Asks:What’s the most outlandish lesson you’ve used to help ELLs comprehend English better?