Middle School
Cross-Curricular

What Does Poverty Look Like?

Did you know that approximately one in five children in the United States is food insecure? Almost 22,000 children die every day from poverty.Teach your students about poverty at home and around the world with these resources that can be tailored to the area of the world you are exploring. Encourage your students to take action to raise awareness of this critical issue. Use multiple media sources to provide students with the skills they need to get involved.
A Collection By Natalie Mroz
  • 11 Collection Items
  • 11 Collection Items
  • Discussion
What Does Poverty Look Like?
  • Natalie Mroz says:
    This website includes lesson ideas and activities for grades 6-12 focused on Social Awareness. It has great quotes to help students see poverty from another perspective as well as seven different lesson ideas, links for further information, and additional activity suggestions.
  • Get Involved

    Website
    borgenproject.org
    borgenproject.org
    Natalie Mroz says:
    Here you will find thirty ideas for getting involved in the fight against poverty. The list is broken up into three categories: Get Political, Build Awareness, and Fundraise. You may choose to have your students take a look at some of the ideas and choose one or two they feel comfortable completing.
  • Natalie Mroz says:
    This video shows what it's like to live in poverty in the U.S. It is a very powerful message that really shows some of the issues of poverty for families in a way that children can understand.
  • Natalie Mroz says:
    This listing of facts and figures related to poverty issues compares the U.S. statistics to other locations in the world. This can help your students understand that though the poverty may "look" different, we have many of the same issues here.
  • Natalie Mroz says:
    Use this interactive map to examine the poverty level in any area, including yours, in America. This is a great way to have students compare their own area with any other area in the country. Students can look at where they live now and relate they to where they used to live or where their grandparents live. They can guess what area near them has the highest poverty rate. There are lots of ways to use this resource.
  • Natalie Mroz says:
    This is another visual to show students the vast number of people living in poverty. Students can use this map and the one above to talk about how the geography and/or political systems in a location may be contributing factors to poverty.
  • Natalie Mroz says:
    This visual shows different economic statistics for Africa and can be used to help your students make comparisons about how poverty affects people in many different ways. Ask questions such as, "Which country seems to have the lowest rate of per capita GDP, literacy, and life expectancy?" "Highest?" "What can you infer about those countries?"
  • Natalie Mroz says:
    This outstanding picture book could be used in any grade to teach children about poverty and homelessness as well as to show that compassion comes in many forms.
  • tcdailyplanet.net
    tcdailyplanet.net

    Children's books portray the tough reality of hunger and poverty

    5 minute read
    Natalie Mroz says:
    Here is an excellent list of picture books that can be used in the classroom to teach the students about poverty. These books deal with poverty in the United States and also elsewhere in the world.
  • Natalie Mroz says:
    This is a wonderful booklet with lots of information and activities that can be used with your students to examine issues related to poverty, generate discussions, and talk about ways that students can get involved.
  • globalissues.org
    globalissues.org

    Poverty Facts and Stats

    Article
    Natalie Mroz says:
    This resource includes facts about poverty from around the world. Use it to find information to help your students understand the may aspects, causes, and effects of poverty. Students can discuss which fact is most interesting to them and why or what it means to live on $2.50 per day.