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Helping Kids Become Their Own Conductors-Developing Executive Functioning Skills

Executive functioning skills refer to a person’s ability to organize thoughts, control impulses, regulate emotions, and access information in the brain to apply it when needed. These are the skills children need to be successful students, adults need to be competent workers, and everyone needs to have positive relationships. The frontal lobe of the brain controls most aspects of executive functioning and there are many strategies for increasing executive functioning skills.
A Collection By Elizabeth Beatley
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  • 5 Collection Items
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Helping Kids Become Their Own Conductors-Developing Executive Functioning Skills
  • Elizabeth Beatley says:
    Check out this blog for elementary lesson plans related to developing working memory and emotional control. Some of the lessons require a significant amount of preparation, but the blogger has provided the templates so that makes it easier. There is a quick and easy "If, then" lesson that does not require much preparation at all. I like to use the tool in this lesson to help students connect their behaviors and choices to positive consequences.
  • Elizabeth Beatley says:
    What better way to get 21st century kids’ attention than to include apps and games in their learning? This webinar shares great tips about specific games and apps that teachers and parents can use to develop kids’ executive functioning skills. It also includes information about developing executive functioning skills in alternative learners, so it is very helpful to special education teachers or counselors serving students with special education needs.
  • Elizabeth Beatley says:
    If your teachers are asking for ways to increase positive interactions, self control, and learning in their classrooms, share this article with them. When teachers come to me with these concerns (which happens often), I love being able to quickly provide them with practical ideas that they can use in their classrooms. I have had many teachers comment that they found these ideas helpful.
  • Elizabeth Beatley says:
    This is a “quick glance” resource that succinctly outlines 8 executive functioning skills, explains what they are, and describes what it may look like if each skill is underdeveloped. Because this resource also provides links to information about fun games and activities that can be done at home to develop executive functioning skills, it can be used as a wonderful talking point during parent-teacher conferences.
  • Elizabeth Beatley says:
    This You Tube video is a great introduction to what executive functioning is and why it is important. When I teach executive functioning lessons in classrooms, I always send a letter home to families about my lessons. In that letter, I invite families to watch this video to get a better understanding of what executive functioning is.
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