Middle School
Cross-Curricular

Managing in the Middle: Strategies for Classroom Management with Middle Schoolers

Teachers of middle schoolers will concede that they are perhaps the most challenging yet most enjoyable group of students they have ever had the privilege of teaching and most wouldn't trade places with an elementary or secondary teacher for any amount of salary. These strategies will enable teachers to effectively engage middle school students and at the same time manage to keep the classroom running like a fine tuned machine! Excellent teaching doesn't matter without effective management!
A Collection By Ella Bowling
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Managing in the Middle: Strategies for Classroom Management with Middle Schoolers
  • Ella Bowling says:
    This immense 112 page document (PDF) provides an abundance of brain break ideas that can be implemented at a variety of grade levels. When I first learned about brain breaks and how they could help classroom management and improve student behavior, I was impressed! As the student that always finished my work early and became bored, these would have been a great way for my teachers to engage me on a positive front.
  • middleweb.com
    middleweb.com

    10 Ways to Sabotage Your Classroom Management

    10 minute read
    Ella Bowling says:
    We have all been guilty of these at some point in our teaching career. As a veteran teacher, even though I don't feel like one, these are things that I tell new teachers when I have the opportunity to work with them in mentorship settings. We all want students to accept us and like us but we must understand that we are first their teacher and their learning should be our key concern.
  • Ella Bowling says:
    Who doesn't enjoy a good competition? This game is simple, making it something that I could easily think about integrating it into my box of tricks. Middle schoolers thrive on competition and this provides a great way for a teacher to wrangle in a talkative class without having to raise one's voice!
  • Ella Bowling says:
    I can totally relate to the growth this teacher experienced in their skill in classroom management! The five tips provided in this article are easily implemented and in reality, they're common sense approaches on how to deal with students effectively. I personally enjoyed the ideas presented in tip #3 where they encourage a teacher to come up with something unique to his or her class. I do lots of quirky and fun things, but I realize that there are lots of other options out there for me!
  • Ella Bowling says:
    The title of this video certainly got my attention and after watching, it provided great ideas for the middle school classroom.
  • Ella Bowling says:
    I was hesitant to utilize this resource at first because many of the activities seemed aimed towards primary students but in reality, as I scanned through, I realized my middle schoolers would certainly buy into many of these approaches. Middle school teachers like myself often forget that while these adolescents we are teaching may look like young adults, they are still children at heart and will respond to many positive behavior reinforcements like those presented in this blog post.
  • Ella Bowling says:
    This is a short, concise blog post that provides great tools that any teacher can implement in his or her classroom with ease! The author gives real life connections in her discussion of these five characteristics of classroom managers that are effective, enabling readers to have more buy in to it.
  • edutopia.org
    edutopia.org

    The Art of Managing Middle School Students

    5 minute read
    Ella Bowling says:
    Wow! That was my response when finding this resource. I literally laughed aloud when I read the first paragraph of this article comparing middle schoolers to squirrels, because as a 12 year veteran of the middle school, I can certainly relate! I loved the two resources that the author deemed as a necessity when managing middle schoolers, distraction and relationship! I have long used both of these tactics in my teaching repertoire, but I really enjoyed his approaches to both.