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Anxiety in Children and Teens: What Teachers Can Do

Anxiety is diagnosed in more and more people. With parents, school, and their future, teens and children can get stressed out. Sometimes it's temporary, but other times it's generalized anxiety. Being able to recognize possible symptoms as well as making the classroom a more inviting place can do a lot to help anxious students be happier.
A Collection By Gelyn Angus
  • 6 Collection Items
  • 6 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Anxiety in Children and Teens: What Teachers Can Do
  • Gelyn Angus says:
    A type of anxiety, social anxiety, is a possibility in the very shy kids. They'll be uncomfortable meeting new people, presenting in front of the class, and maintaining eye contact. However, reducing the social interaction these students have to participate in won't help these students, as they won't learn how to manage their anxiety. Referring them to see a counselor to help is the best solution for these students, but there are some accommodations that the teacher can do to help.
  • Gelyn Angus says:
    These present useful tips that the teacher can take. I do like the homework packet, especially giving choices within the packet to do, having done that myself. Another key tip is to get the students moving. This can play very nicely in with Total Physical Response (TPR) in the classroom. Also, seeing the teacher moving and acting goofy can make the students more comfortable as well moving around.
  • Gelyn Angus says:
    Knowing what anxiety looks like in students is important. Various symptoms are listed for what anxiety may look like at school. There are various interventions that the school can provide to accommodate the student's anxiety.
  • nancyrappaport.com
    nancyrappaport.com

    Anxiety in Students

    20 minute read
    Gelyn Angus says:
    Helping students self-regulate their anxiety, while also providing accommodations is important. Traditional punishment and reward structures aren't very effective with these students. Instead, prevention is emphasized. It's important to notice how a student is reacting and learning to calm them before their behavior escalates.
  • Gelyn Angus says:
    These are more tips that teachers can use. What seems to be key with this set is student knowledge of what to expect. The anxiety will be reduced if they know what is coming up.
  • theatlantic.com
    theatlantic.com

    When Anxiety Hits at School

    5 minute read
    Gelyn Angus says:
    Nearly 8% of teens have some sort of anxiety. Teachers have reported more anxious students in their classrooms. Nurses and counselors agree, and add that the severity of the cases are also worse than ever. Teachers, counselors, and nurses all communicating with each other about the student is essential for helping the learner manage.
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BloomBoard Asks:How have you applied ideas from this collection to your classroom?