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Stop Bullying in Schools: What you can do

Name calling, merciless teasing, shoving other students...all these are examples of bullying which happens. How can a teacher stop this or even prevent it from happening?
A Collection By Gelyn Angus
  • 6 Collection Items
  • 6 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Stop Bullying in Schools: What you can do
  • Gelyn Angus says:
    This hour long webinar discusses points such as what is bullying, provides statistics on where it starts, as well as tips on what to do if you suspect a child is being bullied. I have linked to the middle of the webinar, to statistics which surprised me on where bullying takes place. For high scholars, most bullying takes place in the classroom, even when the teacher is present.
  • Gelyn Angus says:
    As the saying goes, an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. In the end, preventing the bullying is easier than stopping what already is occurring. If your administration is willing and able, start bully prevention seminars early and create an official policy, if one isn't already in place.
  • Gelyn Angus says:
    "Setting up an environment in which all students are safe from bullying is imperative. It's important for the victims of bullying to have a role model that they can look up to and feel comfortable to report what occurred. Along those lines, it's important for the teacher to watch themselves so they aren't bullying a student. It can be easy for light teasing to go too far, which also may encourage the other students to mimic the teacher's example."
  • scholastic.com
    scholastic.com

    Cyberbullying: What Teachers and Schools Can Do

    15 minute read
    Gelyn Angus says:
    Even though students may tease each other as friends in good fun, as this article notes, it becomes bullying if it's done repeatedly and it mistreats that person. Girls seem to live true to the catty stereotype and are bullied verbally more than boys. Unfortunately, there isn't much to be done in way of legally stopping the online bullying; even so, it's important for teachers to take the situation seriously.
  • Gelyn Angus says:
    Bullying can be divided up into three categories: verbal, social, and physical. Verbal and social bullying can also occur online, which is more difficult to prevent.
  • Gelyn Angus says:
    What does bullying look like? The web interview discusses what bullying looks like as well as provides tips for teachers on what to do. It is important to note that traditional bullying of name calling, teasing, and social isolation can also occur online through cyber bullying, where the students are hidden behind the screen.