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Analyzing Student Misconceptions

Students often develop misconceptions about certain things and it is up to their teachers to dispel them. It is also beneficial for teachers to keep some form of record of these student ideas in order to better inform their teaching practice. This collection will provide some background into student misconceptions and offer some techniques as to how teachers can work around them.
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A Collection By Jeffrey Sack
  • 8 Collection Items
  • 8 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Analyzing Student Misconceptions
  • emis.de
    emis.de

    Investigating Teacher's Responses to Student Misconceptions

    15 minute read
    Jeffrey Sack says:
    It is not bad enough that students often come to class thinking incorrectly about certain topics. Sometimes teachers also have faulty ideas about things that they pass along to students. This article investigated how teachers responded to students who presented misconceptions in class. I really think this article is great! All too often the teacher side of things gets ignored. The findings here are very important and should be considered by all teachers.
  • Jeffrey Sack says:
    Many times teachers have students who are so focused on an idea that no matter how wrong it is, they will not be able to change their mind. This article does a wonderful job of outlining the different kinds of misconceptions students can have and what teachers can do to break them down for students and overcome them. I think this summary is full of information and would be a great resources for all teachers.
  • rossmanchance.com
    rossmanchance.com

    Anticipating and Addressing Student Misconceptions

    15 minute read
    Jeffrey Sack says:
    The authors of this study provide some examples of student misconceptions they anticipated and how they went about dealing with them when they occurred. They also present some formative assessment tools they used to evaluate the level of student misconception. While the focus of this paper is a statistics course, the information presented could be extrapolated and used in all other classes.
  • dese.mo.gov
    dese.mo.gov

    Alerts to Student Difficulties and Misconceptions in Science

    15 minute read
    Jeffrey Sack says:
    One of the most common places students exhibit misconceptions in the field of science. This article reviews some of these and provides advice on how to deal with them. I think a solid understanding of science is essential for all students and making certain they have an accurate knowledge of it is important. I think if a teacher takes the information presented here and uses it in their instruction, the students will be better able to develop their science content knowledge.
  • Jeffrey Sack says:
    What are areas where students can develop misconceptions? This video from the Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning at Kennessaw State University outlines several different things about which students can develop misunderstandings. I think that, while the speaker is quite dry, the points he makes are quite good. He focuses on STEM classes, but there are several things here that I feel could be used in all subjects.
  • Jeffrey Sack says:
    Focused on math misconceptions, this video explores how problem-based learning can be used to draw out the misunderstandings students have. I think this is a great idea. I like the way the teacher deals with the students and runs the class. I think this is a great video to use to model good teaching when presented with student misunderstandings.
  • apa.org
    apa.org

    How Do I Get My Students Over Their Alternative Conceptions (Misconceptions) for Learning

    10 minute read
    Jeffrey Sack says:
    Most students have preconceived notions about many things a teacher is trying to teach them. These can often lead to misconceptions by the students. This wonderful article offers a lot of advice on what teachers can do to dispel these false ideas. I also love how there is a link to another page that lists common misconceptions students may have in science, math, and English/language arts.
  • designedinstruction.com
    designedinstruction.com

    Modeling for Learning: Addressing Student Misconceptions

    5 minute read
    Jeffrey Sack says:
    The authors of this article suggest that modeling for learning is a great way to address students' misconceptions. They say that asking questions is a good way for these student ideas to come out and that teachers should create activities that respect a student's views, but works to present the facts. I really like the technique presented here. I think it provides a great way for teachers to work with students instead of just telling them that their ideas are wrong.
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