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Cross-Curricular

Evidence Backed Positions

In order for students to increase their learning skills it is important they learn how to present arguments and take a stand on issues that are important to them. By doing this, they strengthen their abilities to question, research, categorize, and explain. Be engaging in activities that develop these skills, students will be better off to defend their positions. This collection provides some activities that allow students to engage in this type of thinking.
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A Collection By Jeffrey Sack
  • 8 Collection Items
  • 8 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Evidence Backed Positions
  • Jeffrey Sack says:
    This is one of the best resources I have seen about the use of evidence in writing. It provides a very detailed explanation as to why evidence is important and gives many examples of how to use it to defend one's position. This webpage is a great place to start students learning how to incorporate evidence into their writing and speaking.
  • Jeffrey Sack says:
    Here is another great video that describes the differences between claims, reasoning, and evidence. I would have students view this video as a homework assignment so they would have a basic understanding of these terms before starting a classroom activity.
  • Jeffrey Sack says:
    This is a great video that outlines the differences between reasoning and evidence and explains why they are essential in the formulation of an argument. I think this is would be a great video to show to students before starting a lesson that will involve these skills.
  • Jeffrey Sack says:
    The author of these lesson plans has put together a huge collection of PowerPoint presentations that can be used to teach students how to build evidence-based arguments. While geared towards ELA, the concepts within these presentations can be transferred to any subject. I think this is a great set of resources that would be beneficial to any teacher in any subject.
  • Jeffrey Sack says:
    This is a wonderful lesson plan that can be used to develop a student's ability to make claims and provide evidence to support them. Using Steve Jobs as a model, the students need to dissect his commencement speech and determine the major points. There are many handouts linked to the page which are a great resource. I think this is a great activity that really drives the important point of evidence home.
  • Jeffrey Sack says:
    A wonderful short video showing a students making claims, describing evidence for those claims, and then arguing why they feel their claims are correct. I think being able to see these skills in action would be beneficial to teachers as they implement lessons that encourage these skills.
  • lifehacker.com
    lifehacker.com

    How to Find Evidence to Support Any Argument

    20 minute read
    Jeffrey Sack says:
    Evidence is the key to any argument. It provides the support one needs in order to state their case. This article does a great job showing various places one can go to collect the evidence needed. I think this article does a great job teaching students the differences between good evidence and bad evidence and also is wonderful at pointing out places where students can fall into traps in their beliefs.
  • jerz.setonhill.edu
    jerz.setonhill.edu

    Academic Argument: Evidence-based Defense of a Non-obvious Position

    10 minute read
    Jeffrey Sack says:
    This article provides some examples of different forms of arguments, and outlines how they develop and will be resolved. The author does a great job providing support for the importance of argumentation and evidence when presenting one's case. I think this would be a great article to read before trying to develop a lesson plan.
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