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Cross-Curricular

Understanding Data Types

Classroom teachers are bombarded with many different types of data. They have student performance data, attendance data, student demographic data, behavior data, non-cognitive data, among others. Keeping track of all these different types is difficult, as is figuring out what to do with it all. This collection will detail the different types of data teachers collect and offer ways to keep it organized.
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A Collection By Jeffrey Sack
  • 8 Collection Items
  • 8 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Understanding Data Types
  • Jeffrey Sack says:
    A group of teachers has created this Power Point to detail how teachers can collect data in their classrooms, what types of data can be collected, and what teachers should do with it once they have it. While this presentation would probably be better in person, I liked the information it had to offer and think it will be beneficial as a starting point of data collection.
  • Jeffrey Sack says:
    What data will be collected and of what type is it? Organizing classroom data can be a challenge, but this handy table can help keep things organized. It has nice columns that ask how the data is being used, from where it comes, and who will have access to it. I think this would be a great tool to keep classroom data organized when creating a classroom inventory.
  • Jeffrey Sack says:
    Checklists are one method of data collection that can assess many different types of student learning and demographics. This video discusses how checklists can be used in the classroom. I think checklists are quite useful. They are simple, but can identify many different pieces of student learning.
  • Data collection, analysis, and Use

    Website
    classroomconnections.eq.edu.au
    classroomconnections.eq.edu.au
    Jeffrey Sack says:
    Data collection allows teachers to better understand their students. This article provides a great summary of what types of data teachers can collect and then how they can go about analyzing to drive instructional practices. I recommend reading this before starting to collect data as it does a nice job of outlining the process.
  • ascd.org
    ascd.org

    Why Teachers Must Be Data Experts

    15 minute read
    Jeffrey Sack says:
    Educational Leadership posted a great article on why teachers need to collect and analyze data from their classrooms. It discusses the issues that surround collecting a lot of data, but also describes all of the different types that can be gathered beyond test scores. I think this article is a great read for anyone just starting out collecting their own data.
  • Jeffrey Sack says:
    Here is a short blog entry that discusses what classroom data should be collected and what should be done with it. I like the conversational style of the writing and think the author does a wonderful job breaking down the idea of data collection.
  • Jeffrey Sack says:
    The University of Michigan has written this wonderful outline of the different types of data teachers can collect and broken them down into three main categories. It then lists specific places from where teachers can get the desired data. I really like the way this site is organized and think that it will be really helpful to teachers starting out in their data collection.
  • sedl.org
    sedl.org

    Using Data to Guide Instruction and Improve Student Learning

    5 minute read
    Jeffrey Sack says:
    With all the data available to teachers, it can be very confusing as to what is important and what is not. This article shows how data can be used to drive instructional decisions and gives examples from several states that are focusing on using data. I think this article provides some good evidence as to why data is important.
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