High School
Math

A Logical Approach to Teaching Logarithmic Pre-Calculus Equations

Lessons in logarithms begin with simple memorization of rules, and end with the beauty of the logarithmic spiral manifested in nature.
A Collection By Katelyn Ringrose
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A Logical Approach to Teaching Logarithmic Pre-Calculus Equations
  • io9.com
    io9.com

    15 Uncanny Examples of the Golden Ratio in Nature

    Article
    Katelyn Ringrose says:
    After learning about how to craft logarithmic functions, students should be able to conceptually grasp the three dimensional aspects of logarithmic spirals. This link shows many real life examples of the Golden Ratio - including the spirals or a tornado, the fronds of a fern and the curve of a sea shell. I love the beauty and the meaning behind these images, and this is a great way for you to help your students visualize the Golden Ratio.
  • Katelyn Ringrose says:
    After utilizing these resources, your students should be able to fully tackle these eight quiz questions.
  • Katelyn Ringrose says:
    This real life experiment of radioactive decay displays the properties of logarithms (while being tasty!). I love using candy to motivate my students, mostly because I also indulge in some snacking, but also because it's so fun to see them get excited about math! Plus, these types of lesson plans are rarely made for older students - so it's great to see something like this for high schoolers.
  • Katelyn Ringrose says:
    This TED Talk video is followed by a short quiz to make sure your students were paying attention. I would suggest assigning this as homework and having your student take a picture, or print out, of their quiz results. I love that TED offers these lessons, and if you're flipping your classroom - these are an absolute necessity.
  • Katelyn Ringrose says:
    This 24 page handout is great for an in-class assignment, or for group work. Each type of example is followed by a handful of problems that follow a similar principle. This is perfect for a sub day, or simply as a group assignment.
  • Katelyn Ringrose says:
    This blog suggests that the traditional way of teaching logarithms, where the student gets their answer wrong without receiving an explanation, is faulty. Instead, this author suggests guiding your student to the proof by prompting them to remember the definition of a log. I love this concept because it teaches students how to fully understand the reasons why they are learning logs, rather than just rote memorization.
  • Katelyn Ringrose says:
    I find that it's helpful to send a video home with students, especially when it comes to Logarithms because they might need the visual reminder of where to move their digits. I especially love the Khan Academy because their instructors are always so clear and concise.
  • serc.carleton.edu
    serc.carleton.edu

    Logarithms

    Article
    Katelyn Ringrose says:
    This page gives great real life examples of when a student might need to use logarithms. Geological examples include radioactive decay and dating, population growth and changes in atmospheric CO2. This is great when my students have difficulty conceptualizing mathematical equations, or when I simply want to inspire them - and show them a few ways that math is applicable to future career choices!
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