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Cross-Curricular

Creating Meaningful Dialogue about World Cultures through the Use of First Person Narratives

First person narration, or storytelling, is powerful for not only the student speaker but the peer listeners as well. Through show-and-tell, reading activities, and hands-on creative assignments, K-5 students will learn how to approach cultural differences with curiosity and empathy, and how to ask meaningful questions with a broader sociocultural understanding.
A Collection By Katelyn Ringrose
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  • 8 Collection Items
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Creating Meaningful Dialogue about World Cultures through the Use of First Person Narratives
  • Katelyn Ringrose says:
    This video is an excellent example of critical cultural thought. The two narrators speak about their personal experiences with race, and how it personally affects them.
  • Katelyn Ringrose says:
    My students love Google Earth! It's an excellent way to help them visualize our planet. I always use Google Earth when we are discussing history, and this is a great tool to help them gain perspective on where other cultures are situated.
  • Katelyn Ringrose says:
    These amazing vocabulary packets help students develop cultural literacy and - at just a little over a dollar each - these are a great deal!
  • Katelyn Ringrose says:
    This short video depicts the conversation about culture that took place on the U.S. State Department's Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs' social media sites. My students love this video and the infographic that accompanies it.
  • Katelyn Ringrose says:
    The "Fact vs. Fiction" PBS series debunks stereotypes about ethnicities. The videos are really engaging and help students think critically about the words they use to describe others. I loved these videos, not only on a professional level, but a personal one. I felt that these films are something everyone should see - not just kids!
  • Katelyn Ringrose says:
    This PowerPoint on how to integrate show-and-tell into your lesson plans includes a sample calendar on how to establish show-and-tell as a daily routine. Show-and-tell does not always have to be a physical object. It can be a word from a different language, a presentation on a foreign country, or even a few sentences on a foreign person of influence. My students love the attention that the other students pay them, and this is a good chance for shy students to make new friends.
  • earlychildhoodnews.com
    earlychildhoodnews.com

    Show-and-Tell

    Article
    Katelyn Ringrose says:
    My kindergarteners love show-and-tell! This article on how to successfully integrate show-and-tell into lower elementary school classrooms is a great resource to foster language skills and attention in young students with limited attention spans. Asking students to bring in an item that has cultural significance to them (something that a classmate might not have previously seen) encourages students to ask questions about the object(s) and its significance.
  • Katelyn Ringrose says:
    I love that this book helped my kindergartners embrace cultural empathy. This book takes about fifteen minutes to read aloud, and includes a lot of information about the main character's, Unhei's, Korean Culture. The book will help the students pronounce new words and think about culture in a critical way. For slightly older students, up to about third grade, this is a great silent reading book.
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