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The Arts

Interactively Teaching Musical Notes in a Middle School Musical Education Classroom

Being able to compose and read music is the most basic and important skill you can teach your students, and it's important that it's done in a fun and memorable way. The following resources will go over how to teach musical notes in an informative and exciting way.
A Collection By Katelyn Ringrose
  • 10 Collection Items
  • 10 Collection Items
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Interactively Teaching Musical Notes in a Middle School Musical Education Classroom
  • The NAMM Foundation

    Website
    nammfoundation.org
    nammfoundation.org
    Katelyn Ringrose says:
    The NAMM Foundation funds music research along with creating music making opportunities for students. The website's free newsletter, along with their tips for educators are incredibly helpful when it comes to planning school performances.
  • Using Pentatonic Scales

    Lesson plan
    teachers.theguardian.com
    teachers.theguardian.com
    Katelyn Ringrose says:
    This free interactive tool offered by the Guardian's Teaching Network was designed to teach students the pentatonic major scale.
  • Katelyn Ringrose says:
    Musician Evelyn Glennie, deaf since the age of 12, hosts this gorgeous TED talk on how to feel, rather than just hear, music. This video will prompt your students to think about music critically as not just sounds or notes on paper, but as vibrations and colors.
  • Katelyn Ringrose says:
    The first thirteen slides of this informative powerpoint goes over Quarter Notes, Half Notes, Dotted Half Notes, Whole Notes and Eighth Notes along with all of their rests. The last two slides explain musical Dynamics and includes an interactive vocabulary display to help your students remember each new term.
  • Katelyn Ringrose says:
    These thirty-six free lesson plans by Ms. Garrett of Green Acres Middle School in Birmingham, Alabama will help you get your year organized. Ms. Garret's lessons begin with teaching students to read music, and end with them composing their own songs on Mixcraft software.
  • Katelyn Ringrose says:
    If your students do learn best with note cards, and they have ready access to technology, don't think twice about assigning them a musical notes Quizlet pack! My students use quizlet for everything, and with this free premade set of tech flash cards, you can't go wrong!
  • Katelyn Ringrose says:
    This free printable poster and set of notecards is a great way to get your students interested in memorizing and visualizing musical notes. Plus, it's free! Who doesn't love free resources?
  • Name that Note

    Website
    teachingideas.co.uk
    teachingideas.co.uk
    Katelyn Ringrose says:
    This game is a fun and helpful way to get your students to memorize their notes, which is the first step before they are able to fluently write and read music.
  • Katelyn Ringrose says:
    These short (three to ten minute) video podcasts focus on music education, software, technique, technology, and helpful apps. These are great to listen to in the car on the way to work, and will give you some new ideas about what software to implement into your classroom. I know that I am personally really tired of Garageband!
  • Katelyn Ringrose says:
    Music Pal is a free app that allows you to take a picture of a score and it will play it back. This is a great way for students to make mental connections between written and audible scores. I hesitate to advocate for it too heavily though, since I do think that it's great for students to learn tactilly before using such a tool.
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