Upper Elementary
Math

Tips for Teaching the Order of Operations to Elementary School Students

From the simple "Please Excuse My Dead Aunt Sally" to more complex quizzes, you can use these resources to effectively teach your 3rd to 5th graders the proper order of operations. This is extremely important as they will use this basic method throughout all of their future math classes.
A Collection By Katelyn Ringrose
  • 8 Collection Items
  • 8 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Tips for Teaching the Order of Operations to Elementary School Students
  • Katelyn Ringrose says:
    This poster, for under ten dollars, goes over the "Please excuse my dear Aunt Sally" method for quickly teaching the order of operations. This is a helpful and fun way to remind younger students of the necessary steps they should take to properly solve more complex equations. I love classroom decor that is useful, since there's nothing worse than a bare or congested class.
  • Katelyn Ringrose says:
    This worksheet, or quiz, has twenty-six problems that test students on a variety of PEMDAS concepts. The worksheet comes with a handy answer sheet on the third and fourth pages.This is perfect for sub days, or when you want to make sure your students are understanding coursework.
  • Katelyn Ringrose says:
    This song is fun and catchy, and the video is helpful too as a memory tool for younger students. I found myself using it just the other day on a complex equation, which cracked me up!
  • Katelyn Ringrose says:
    This resource is helpful for students who are struggling with order of operations concepts. Designed for younger students, the Khan academy offers this free course which you can assign as an additional resource.
  • Katelyn Ringrose says:
    This site is super helpful as an in-class activity to help get your students used to quickly solving equations with many different signs.
  • Order of Operations

    Website
    dadsworksheets.com
    dadsworksheets.com
    Katelyn Ringrose says:
    Dad's worksheets are great for when you're in a pinch and don't want to create your own take home, or in class assignments.
  • Katelyn Ringrose says:
    This timed game prompts students to rescue royals by solving long equations. This can double as homework, and you can ask your students for a print out or screenshot of their results. They have to get a total of seven equations correct, and you can implement a time request on them as well.
  • Katelyn Ringrose says:
    These four games quiz students on their understanding of the order of operations, and are really fun and appropriate for the classroom. They also work on the ipad, so if your classroom has ipads like mine, your students will get a lot out of their free time.