Middle School
English Language Arts

Introducing Argument Through the Literary Lens

The Common Core State Standards puts a large emphasis on argumentation, but what is the best way to transition middle school students from narrative to argument writing? This collection was first inspired in 2007 by Los Angeles Writing Project fellow by the name of Eddie Munoz, who was an English Professor at East Los Angeles Community College. It has evolved much over the years,
A Collection By Lovelyn Marquez
  • 6 Collection Items
  • 6 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Introducing Argument Through the Literary Lens
  • Lovelyn Marquez says:
    This book chapter will help teachers create lessons for literary arguments if they do not have access to the Units of Study-Literary Essays. It also supports the idea that teachers can start with literature that students have already read to introduce argument writing. This resource also gives a student sample that teachers and students can use as a model for literary argument writing.
  • Lovelyn Marquez says:
    This resource provides a list of the different verdicts. This can be used to create a handout for students with the scenario that the drunkard, who the Filipino stabbed multiple times, was pronounced dead. The Filipino is going to trial, and a group of jurors will determine his innocence or guilt. This resource can be used to list and describe the different verdicts, which students will need to understand before they can make a judgement on the Filipino's actions.
  • Lovelyn Marquez says:
    After reading "The Fiipino and the Drunkard", students get this handout (one page per character)t, and they used it to analyze the different characters' actions by writing down a quote, the action's meaning as far as what the character actually did and the motive behind it, and the significance or effects of the actions towards the characters themselves, each other, the story as a whole, and the theme of the story.
  • Lovelyn Marquez says:
    For those who are unfamiliar with this strategy, this video gives a teacher's account of how it works and its benefits
  • readingandwritingproject.com
    readingandwritingproject.com

    The Literary Essay: Teacher Resource

    Article
    Lovelyn Marquez says:
    This resource gives background information on the Units of Study and the idea behind the unit called "The Literary Essay", which teachers can supplement and/or supplant, like I did with this collection.
  • Lovelyn Marquez says:
    In order for students to write a literary essay, they needed literary text that would allow them to analyze characters' actions and the motives and consequences of those actions. Students get multiple opportunities to practice this skill because they do close reading of the drunkard's, the Filipino's, and the crowd's actions. After writing an analysis of how the writer uses actions throughout the story, they write how those actions teach theme of the story.
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