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Math Literature About Fractions

Fraction math moves fairly quickly to words problems, especially in Jr. High. Developing the concept with the vocabulary happens quicker by using well developed narrative stories.
A Collection By Mary Page
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Math Literature About Fractions
  • Stuart J. Murphy says:
    A MathStart story about understanding halves, read by Janet Ginsburg.
  • Mary Page says:
    My students loved the sheets in this book. The stories are interesting and funny. The stories are fun to draw. Much of the math is more for Jr. High. It takes more than one class period but well worth it. I used after a unit or for maintenance since the math skills were in place. The set up let me work on math language in a fun way. After a student can do a math story with many problems, a state assessment item seems much easier to handle.
  • Mary Page says:
    Video that relays fractions concepts up to Jr. High and Pre-Algebra stage. It reviews basic concepts and then goes to story form. It relays words problems about fraction with pictures. This process is what a specialist teacher does with at-risk students. It begins with vocabulary, pictures, and a conversation. It moves to more formal problems and questions.
  • Mary Page says:
    The books I used are gone but were similar to this one. Fraction books are rare in primary. It's important early on students are exposed to pictures of fractions. This book has the necessary components.
  • Mary Page says:
    Another book that takes ordinary items and shows the fractions in it. This is another book my at-risk students would explore time and time again. I used it after they did not do so well on something to go back to a positive can do attitude about fractions. Now we know what you do not know. Look you understood 6 out of 10 things. You only have 4 more things to learn. Let's find out what those 4 things are.
  • Mary Page says:
    Dave Adler has a gift for seeing math in real life and then taking a kids point of view with it. Students read his books over and over again. If they were afraid of fractions well by the time they experienced Dave they were over it. Useful for introducing a unit or finishing one. Grand for sending home for homework and asking a Dad to read the book to them and talk about fractions they use at work.
  • Mary Page says:
    Chocolate bars are part of a students life. Hershey bars with the rectangles mimic the models put on the state assessments. at-risk students love the book. You can create a Hershey graphic on the computer. Type the language of the book on a sheet, read the book, then have students work out the math with a Hershey bar manipulative. Or use real Hershey bars.
  • Mary Page says:
    The visual concept of whole in many forms is crucial to the foundation of fraction learning. Whole takes many forms so a picture book helps much in establishing that in the mind of an at-risk student. Often at-risk students have reading problems so reading to the student helps prep them for word problems.
  • Mary Page says:
    This article shares ways to stock your classroom library on a budget. Talk to your librarian at your school. Often a librarian can make purchases for a designated professional library of resources if they are literature, so you have the math books available. You can also check with the language arts teacher and see if some of the stories are included in her state reading materials.