Lower Elementary2 more
Math

Web Based Fraction Games

Web based computer programs have a lasting impact on student learning. Computers do not have verbal bias, so if a student is successful it moves them to the appropriate level despite grade level. If not so successful, the student has many chances to try again. In general, they have a positive motivating process.
A Collection By Mary Page
  • 8 Collection Items
  • 8 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Web Based Fraction Games
  • Mary Page says:
    The game starts with a simple short video game. This relaxes the students mind. Any time the mind is more relaxed, you learn at a deeper level.Once students finish the short game it, goes to tile cards to compare fractions. Students form the fractions and a visual pops up so they can compare the inequality. Scaffolded instruction with student choice with a way to check their work equals students success.
  • Mixed Numbers

    Webtool
    sheppardsoftware.com
    sheppardsoftware.com
    Mary Page says:
    I like this game because it is short and sweet. It reviews mixed number conversions to improper fractions. It is scaffolded to read a question, convert, and then find the improper fraction. If you get the wrong answer then it gives an explanation. It has other paths to take while you think about your error so it does all the things to keep student concentrating but not giving them anxiety.
  • Mary Page says:
    Identifying isolated equivalent fractions is one thing, but when it is grouped with varying equivalent fractions, students have problems. The game has 5 circles for sorting the mixed group of equivalent fractions. Its in picture and number form. It makes a student form a schema based on sorting which helps them choose answers or eliminate answers on a multiple choice test.
  • Mary Page says:
    I only used this game 6 weeks before the state assessments. With state assessments an endurance factor exists with at-risk students.Once mastering with pictures activities I would move students to this game to check the endurance level. For at-risk students many problems are hard. You have to give paper and insist they sketch every problem.This gives a transition from concrete activity to abstract activity. I limited it to 5 to 10 problems with sketching.
  • Mary Page says:
    This is not my favorite game, but a set of my at-risk students liked it and told me it helped them much. Later I learned that at-risk students often need colored backgrounds and colored object sets to think due to dyslexia or Irlen Syndrome. Something about the game keeps the brain calm and my students liked that. Simple and yet extremely effective in building up confidence. Not drill in kill since it has a linear progression to it to reveal all the possibilities.
  • Mary Page says:
    This activity lets a student do an equivalent fraction with scaffolding.They see the picture, they are guided on how, given the number, and so it creates correct schema in the students mind. It is better to scaffold instruction and have students learn things correctly than let them flounder and learn it incorrectly. Once learned incorrectly it takes much positive reinforcement to remove that and replace with a better approach.
  • Equivalent Fractions

    Webtool
    mathplayground.com
    mathplayground.com
    Mary Page says:
    The simulation gives a visual with a sliding bar to create an equivalent fraction. My students would often get lost in the calculation and lose the sense of the quantity of the fraction. You see the fraction at its beginning level and then see finding the common denominator. You can visually compare the two.Then, transfer it to the number line which is the abstract model of the numbers.
  • Visual Fractions

    Website
    visualfractions.com
    visualfractions.com
    Mary Page says:
    These games have basic level fraction knowledge combined with cartoon visuals. The visuals are not labeled, so by reading the text and looking at the picture, a student learns fraction number sense. They can create number lines visually across a hedge or home to evaluate part to whole.