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Role Models: Keeping Parents Connected with their Teens through Academics

Adolescence is usually a time when teens and their parents begin to drift apart. Keeping parents aware and, most importantly, actively engaged in what's going on in their older children's lives is a great way to foster better parent-teen relationships, encourage self-esteem and overall keep teen students on the right track.
A Collection By Sara Kaplan
  • 9 Collection Items
  • 9 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Role Models: Keeping Parents Connected with their Teens through Academics
  • Sara Kaplan says:
    A Forum for parents of teenagers to discuss topics about raising teens. Login to ask advice of others who have had similar experiences or ask any questions you've been wondering about. Should help provide insight on how to communicate better with teens, and help stay connected to them in everyday life.
  • Sara Kaplan says:
    Learn about this revolutionary program the Parent Teacher Home Visit Project, which brings teachers into their students' homes, so that they can foster better relationships with students and their families as a whole. This project is amazing because students begin to see their teacher as a person, and vice versa. This project connecs parents and teachers in a way that helps link families to the classroom in a way like never before.
  • educationworld.com
    educationworld.com

    Strategies that Work: Getting Parents Involved

    5 minute read
    Sara Kaplan says:
    Discover a variety of activities and strategies that can keep parents engaged in a variety of creative school activities.
  • goodtherapy.org
    goodtherapy.org

    8 Ways Parents Can Help Teens with Academic Overwhelm

    5 minute read
    Sara Kaplan says:
    Pass this information along to Parents---it contains critical advice on how to keep students less stressed at home as they prepare for the big test.
  • sedl.org
    sedl.org

    Engaging Families at the Secondary Level: What Schools Can Do to Promote Family Involvement

    15 minute read
    Sara Kaplan says:
    It's all about teamwork! Explore some ways that you, the teacher, and parents can collaborate together to keep parents on board and everyone on the same page.
  • educationworld.com
    educationworld.com

    Activities to promote parent involvement

    5 minute read
    Sara Kaplan says:
    Dscover ways to keep parents actively engaged in the school system! Here are several creative activities that students can work together on in the classroom which will later involve the parents in a collaborative process, or a project that can later be discussed with their parents at home. I love this list because some of the ideas I've never even heard of or considered. It's amazing how simple (in hindsight) some of these ideas are.
  • Sara Kaplan says:
    Listen to this Educator's advice on how we as teachers can help parents stay connected, through their connection with us! He gives straightforward and realistic techniques that help keep parents engaged in their students' academic lives on a regular basis. He also provides very practical reasons for each of these ideas. A very informative outlook into parental involvement through the classroom.
  • Sara Kaplan says:
    Listen to a group of students themselves tell it like it is when it comes to parental communication! It will reveal how teens would prefer to be talked to, and what they'd like from parents in general. If you want to know how your kid feels when you talk to them, or if you as an educator wants to help students discuss their academics better with parents at home, this is a critical video to watch for its humbling look into the lives of teenagers.
  • Sara Kaplan says:
    Provide parents with this vital information on how they can stay more active in their teenager's lives. Not only does it provide an extensive list of very basic activities that a parent can partake in so as to stay connected, it also gives further information on specific topics within the activity examples. It is an article that all parents should read, and can work for students both young and adolescent.