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Getting Students Started with Math Talk

Using mathematical discourse in the classroom is a powerful way to increase our students’ critical thinking, collaboration, and communication skills. However, what does effective math talk in the classroom look and sound like? This collection explores ways to get your students thinking and communicating mathematically from the very first days of school.
A Collection By Shametria Routt
  • 7 Collection Items
  • 7 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Getting Students Started with Math Talk
  • Shametria Routt says:
    Jump start mathematical discourse in your classroom with the authors' four guiding principles to guide classroom discussions: achieve a goal, teach students what and how to share, orient students to each other and mathematical ideas, and teach students to value each other and their ideas. The remainder of the book discusses open-strategy sharing and specific goals for targeted discussions, such as connecting and comparing, justifying solutions, efficiency, clarifications, and making revisions.
  • Shametria Routt says:
    This book is a great resource for getting started with mathematical discourse in the classroom. It begins with an introduction of the five practices: anticipating, monitoring, selecting, sequencing, and connecting. The book highlights these practices through a set of vignettes so that you can see them in action. If you’re looking to begin using more math talk in the classroom, this is an essential read to get you started.
  • Shametria Routt says:
    This video illustrates students sharing their thinking strategies with their class after solving a problem. While it does not illustrate a lot of teacher questioning, it does illustrate other teacher moves, such as the teacher asking the other students to indicate whether they arrived at the same solution with a hand gesture to say, “me too,” and reinforcing students who share with class cheers! I also loved hearing the students’ perspectives about sharing their strategies.
  • gettingsmart.com
    gettingsmart.com

    Talking Math: 6 Strategies for Getting Students to Engage in Mathematical Discourse

    5 minute read
    Shametria Routt says:
    While this article is short and concise, it offers six great strategies to support teachers in choosing effective discourse structures that will promote productive conversation and increase student engagement, such as how to increase individual accountability before shared discussions, encourage students to collaborate with one another, embed questions into the discussion strategically, and use mistakes as teachable moments. It’s a good read with very practical strategies!
  • curriculumassociates.com
    curriculumassociates.com

    Ready: 100 questions that promote Mathematical Discourse

    15 minute read
    Shametria Routt says:
    Embedding questions strategically is essential to help students deepen their understanding of mathematics. What I love about this article is that it offers 100 questions that will encourage students to think more deeply about the content with which they are working and promote more productive conversation and collaboration. This is a great tool to place in your lesson plan book as a quick reference when planning or facilitating discussion!
  • ascd.org
    ascd.org

    Unlocking Engagement Through Mathematical Discourse

    5 minute read
    Shametria Routt says:
    While the information included in this article appears in other aspects of this collection, the article connects mathematical discourse to the mathematical process standards of the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics.
  • gettingsmart.com
    gettingsmart.com

    Talking Math: How to Engage Students in Mathematical Discourse

    5 minute read
    Shametria Routt says:
    This article is a great starting place for any teacher who wants to learn more about how to get started using discourse in the classroom. The visuals in this article provide quick reference tools to illustrate how mathematical discourse looks and sounds in the classroom.