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A Bump in the Right Direction: Preparing for Maternity Leave

When the exciting event of expecting is present in our lives as teachers, the first thing we think of is how we prepare to take leave. If you're concerned about your class's progress in your absence, or want to know the best information to leave with your substitute, this collection is a helpful resource. You'll be able to breathe easy in he classroom during the months before your baby comes!
A Collection By Sian Babish
  • 8 Collection Items
  • 8 Collection Items
  • Discussion
A Bump in the Right Direction: Preparing for Maternity Leave
  • Sian Babish says:
    Stephanie Richardson shares this post from her blog, Eat.Write.Teach. She reflects on lessons learned from teaching while pregnant. Richardson’s collection of practical classroom tips will keep teachers prepared and realistic while expecting in the classroom. I love Tip #4 where she encourages expecting teachers to find help when needed, from TA’s to helpful students!
  • A Math Activity for Maternity

    Activity
    showyourthinkingmath.blogspot.com
    showyourthinkingmath.blogspot.com
    Sian Babish says:
    Annie Forest, a math teacher, explains how she told her 8th grade students she was expecting a baby. Read about how Annie finds a cute and educational way to share her special news with math students. She turns a potentially awkward conversation into a fun, ongoing journey with her class. I love the idea of this activity, and I’m sure teachers of any subject can adapt it!
  • aps.edu
    aps.edu

    Impact of Substitute Teachers on Student Achievement

    12 minute read
    Sian Babish says:
    Ranjana Damle of the Albuquerque Public Schools (New Mexico) puts together this research brief to explain the impact of several aspects of a changing classroom, namely the exchange and replacement of teachers in public schools. The “Discussion” on Page 5 provides invaluable points for expecting teachers, their substitutes, and administration to address so to maintain student progress.
  • huffingtonpost.com
    huffingtonpost.com

    Why I Don't Want My Daughter's Teacher To Take Maternity Leave

    6 minute read
    Sian Babish says:
    Attorney Rebecca Hughes Parker, author of this Huffington Post article, shares concerns for her 2nd grade daughter, whose teacher is going on maternity leave mid-year. Parker wrestles with the potential academic impact of having a new teacher to finish out the school year. I thought this was interesting for teachers, because it can help them to be more aware of parents’ concerns about the classroom during leave.
  • Sian Babish says:
    ReadLearnTeachLife’s Blog presents this guest blog on creating a binder for the long-term sub taking over for your maternity leave. The author, Laura, explains the importance of each item, as well as images of what each section looks like. Her screenshots of individual pages are very helpful, as the lists and diagrams are easy for any teacher to duplicate or customize. I really liked the inclusion of her behavioral plan, because it gives insight into classroom boundaries for the substitute.
  • Sian Babish says:
    ProTeacher.net has a thread that discusses the personal experiences of teachers who have gone through the maternity leave process. Six teachers respond to the original poster, offering helpful tips on coordinating lesson plans with substitutes. This is very focused on the “handing off” process to the sub, and as you will find out, you may have very little to do or quite a bit of involvement in it. I found this to be a very reassuring thread!
  • Sian Babish says:
    While this research paper by Ronfeldt, Loeb, and Wyckoff targets turnover in tough New York schools, there is a section beginning on Page 13 that discusses what happens when teachers are “replaced” by other ones. It specifically discusses the relationship between student achievement as it relates to having a new teacher during the school year. This is a great read for teachers leaving and returning in the same year, so they can connect and prepare their substitute and students accordingly.
  • Sian Babish says:
    MyPrimaryParadise.com shares these 5 tips bestowed by a teacher, Martha, on maternity leave. Martha hits every nail on the head, especially as her tips unfold in a very approachable chronological order. She’s very honest about her last tip, “Goodbye and Let Go,” when she says it’s the hardest and weirdest. I liked her idea to give students a note and tiny memento at this stage, because I think it makes everyone feel connected.