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A Sweet Approach to Students with Diabetes

It's safe to say that at some point, you'll have a student with diabetes in your classroom. As there are advances in medicine and technology related to diabetes, teachers also need to advance in their classroom practices for these students. This collection details ways you can accommodate and help students with diabetes to succeed.
A Collection By Sian Babish
  • 8 Collection Items
  • 8 Collection Items
  • Discussion
A Sweet Approach to Students with Diabetes
  • medicaldaily.com
    medicaldaily.com

    Ten ways to detect hypoglycemia symptoms

    3 minute read
    Sian Babish says:
    Medical Daily has this short, but informative page detailing 10 ways to detect hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) symptoms. It points out that a diabetic person can display different symptoms, as it varies from person to person. I know teachers would benefit by learning these symptoms, paying careful attention to students with diabetes who may need medical intervention.
  • Sian Babish says:
    The Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation produces this 12-minute lesson on diabetes, where young Emily and Jacob educate other children about diabetes. This lively, educational video is a fantastic classroom tool for teachers to raise awareness about students with diabetes in their classroom. I love the balance of scientific information with vivid, active images.
  • Sian Babish says:
    EdMedKids from the University of Arizona discusses classroom problems and solutions for students with diabetes. This page will help you troubleshoot and fix issues related to missed class time, and suggest other ways to accommodate students for making up work. It also touches upon other potential issues in cognitive and academic impairment. I really like how candid this page is, especially when it says, quite bluntly, that there needs to be more research about supporting students with diabetes.
  • Sian Babish says:
    On this page, the American Diabetes Association gives a brief overview of federal law about students with diabetes. You can also find the specific laws of your state, which can sometimes offer more protection for these students. This is a great source of information, especially because state laws have changed in recent years, such as in Virginia.
  • Sian Babish says:
    ABC of Harrisburg, Virginia takes a look about upcoming changes to the policies regarding medical supplies in schools, particularly insulin or meters. Students with Type 1 diabetes will no longer have to see nurses to administer supplies during the day, and will be able to manage it themselves independently. I thought it was interesting to hear a parent say this actually keeps teachers aware and in touch with these students!
  • Sian Babish says:
    Children With Diabetes has a page dedicated to Sample 504 and IEP plans for students with diabetes. There are plans for each grade K-12, each available as a printable Word document. If you’re new to having a student with diabetes, this is a great place to learn about the common accommodations expected, like “stop the clock” for blood glucose testing and bathroom breaks.
  • diabetesforecast.org
    diabetesforecast.org

    "Superstar" Schools Set the Bar for Diabetes Care

    5 minute read
    Sian Babish says:
    Kate Bunker’s article in Diabetes Forecast profiles some elementary schools that are doing an outstanding job with their diabetic students. As you’ll discover, the schools set the bar high, and are even designated by Diabetes.org as a “Safe School.” I liked the bullet points at the end, where it gets specific about certain accommodations for diabetic students.
  • Sian Babish says:
    National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases puts together this 7-part list for school personnel about effective management of students with diabetes. Even though there is a dedicated section, “Actions for the Teacher,” I’ll bet teachers will want to read every section. I really like how Section 1 is a list of common questions and answers, too.