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Cross-Curricular

Dealing With a Child of Recent Divorce in Your Classroom

Divorce is something more and more families are learning to cope with each year. It's no surprise that what goes on at home can affect a child in the classroom. Let's look at the different ways you can support your student academically and personally. This collection focuses on different ways to deal with an affected child of divorce in your classroom.
A Collection By Sian Babish
  • 8 Collection Items
  • 8 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Dealing With a Child of Recent Divorce in Your Classroom
  • Positive Vibes Booklet

    Website
    lorinda-charactereducation.com
    lorinda-charactereducation.com
    Sian Babish says:
    Children are in need of good vibes and a creative outlet during divorce. The Lorinda Character Education Blog offers a printable booklet to help students explore the wide range of feelings they are experiencing. It encourages children to make positive, visual connections to their feelings while making it easier to talk about them. I like how it functions as an artistic prompt!
  • Sian Babish says:
    Dr. Lori Rappaport has a fantastic handout in her GROWING UP GREAT! Series, detailing how children of different ages react to divorce. I like how she discusses recognizing distress in early and later elementary students, as well as adolescents. It largely differs across these age groups. This is a great guide for teachers who notice changing behavior in a student, and can help point them in the right direction for guidance or intervention.
  • Sian Babish says:
    Professor Amara Afifi discusses her work with adolescent students of divorce for Tedx Talks. Listen to how she changed her approach by observing the physiological reactions—including saliva! She draws on several experiences, most notably when discussing how sometimes oversharing by parents can burden children. I was intrigued by her suggestion to email parents sometimes, as opposed to speaking with them face to face, because it can help manage exchanges between parents and teachers.
  • thoughtcatalog.com
    thoughtcatalog.com

    12 Benefits Of Being A Child Of Divorce

    5 minute read
    Sian Babish says:
    Derek Lawrence helps convey the idea that being a child of divorce has its own perks, too. While it has an edgy, comical tone, it can help teachers guide students toward seeing some practical (and bright) aspects of having divorced parents. Some of the 12 points can be taken with a grain of salt, but most of them promote the idea that there is still plenty of love and care to go around from both parents. I find this to be very real, and also reassuring.
  • education.udel.edu
    education.udel.edu

    DIVORCE: RECOMMENDATIONS FOR TEACHERS AND PARENTS

    5 minute read
    Sian Babish says:
    I love how this printable PDF sheet overlaps teachers and parents. This is a great interventional resource for teachers and parents to work with when discussing the child’s best interests in the classroom. For educators, it highlights not becoming overly attached to a youth in crisis, and helps to redirect efforts back to the parents. This is a great tool to begin the adjustment process in the very early stages of divorce so students can be adequately monitored and kept on the right track.
  • www2.uwstout.edu
    www2.uwstout.edu

    The Impact of Divorce on Children: What School Counselors Need to Know

    30 minute read
    Sian Babish says:
    A research paper by Nicole Landucci of University of Wisconsin-Stout explores how divorce directly impacts the academic success of some students. Landucci points out that students in different age brackets display the stress of a divorce differently, which should be taken into account when developing a system of support. This is for any educator looking to have an “all hands on deck” approach to a student of divorce.
  • parents.com
    parents.com

    Books That Help Explain Divorce to Kids

    5 minute read
    Sian Babish says:
    I was thrilled to come across this list of books that helps explain divorce to kids. These ten books, written for children between ages 3 and 8, can help open lines of communication between the educator and student. The best part of the list is its inclusion of recent titles in the last ten years. This is a must-read for school librarians and grade school teachers who are looking to expand their collections for family-related materials.
  • childswork.com
    childswork.com

    Four Ways Classroom Teachers Can Include Students and Families Coping with Divorce

    5 minute read
    Sian Babish says:
    AD Midd’s blog post takes different family structures into consideration. Because Midd promotes open lines of communication, she provides more than one way to troubleshoot managing multiple schedules when it comes to parent-teacher conferences. She has a great point to “eliminate the middle man” of the child when it comes to sending home paperwork. Check out how she works to put the student first and keep all parties involved.