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How Do You Support Gifted Students in Your Class?

We are so fortunate to be graced with an advanced (or gifted and talented) student in our classroom sometimes. While we all want to see these students excel, we find ourselves in a constant search for the right instruction, enrichment materials, and ways to keep the engaged. In this collection, you will discover ways to support your gifted students.
A Collection By Sian Babish
  • 8 Collection Items
  • 8 Collection Items
  • Discussion
How Do You Support Gifted Students in Your Class?
  • Sian Babish says:
    The National Association for Gifted Children provides a variety of resources and support for teachers of gifted students. The dedicated page shares information on best classroom practices, grade-specific guides, and information about upcoming NAGC events. I love how strong the NAGC community is, and I bet their annual convention is phenomenal.
  • davidsongifted.org
    davidsongifted.org

    The Teacher-Parent Connection: Tips for Working with the Parents of a Gifted Student

    4 minute read
    Sian Babish says:
    The Davidson Institute has a great section on forming a strong bond with the parents of the gifted child in your class. It encourages inviting the parents to play a strong role in enrichment outside of school, as well as cooporating to find ways to support the student during class. One key focal point I really liked was to keep the student's stress level under control, so the child can feel balanced.
  • Sian Babish says:
    Miss Giraffe writes her blog post on differentiation, but from a very unique perspective. Having been recognized as gifted at a young age herself, Miss Giraffe shares her techniques to keep an advanced student engaged in a regular classroom. She also shows some of the handouts she uses, and describes how she extends the cognitive lesson for the advanced student. I love her dispelling of myths about teaching gifted students, too!
  • ww2.kqed.org
    ww2.kqed.org

    How Can an Advanced Student Move Ahead in Public School?

    8 minute read
    Sian Babish says:
    Tina Barseghian’s article for KQED.com sheds light on how teachers can support advanced students in public schools by moving them up and/or out of their class. Learn how 5th grader Sintia Marquez in the Palo Alto School District was placed into a Rocketship charter school to support her academic progress with hybrid learning. I was so interested to learn more about Rocketship’s new approach to working with advanced students in individually customized programs.
  • Sian Babish says:
    In this video by Classroom Caboodle, teacher Betsy Weigle shares her observations about common characteristics of gifted students. She gives you ways to help them them socially mix with the students they are more academically advanced than. Weigle also discusses personalizing some lessons, and recognizes how willing parents are to hop on board with enrichment at home. I like how Weigle addresses social, academic, and emotional behaviors of gifted students in this short, 5-minute video.
  • Sian Babish says:
    This board has a broad range of enrichment activities for advanced students in all grades and subjects. You can find a list of links with short descriptions so you can find exactly what you’re looking for. There is also an awesome breakdown of Differentiation in the beginning. I think this will really help teachers provide appropriate and worthwhile enrichment activities for their advanced students.
  • nagc.org
    nagc.org

    What it Means to Teach Gifted Learners Well

    4 minute read
    Sian Babish says:
    Dr. Carol Ann Tomlinson (University of Virginia) compares and contrasts the difference between good and inappropriate instruction for gifted learners. Dr. Tomlinson encourages teacher to be in touch with the progress of a gifted student, so the student isn’t falling out of touch by being so far ahead. I love how Dr. Tomlinson appreciates that the theory seems easy, but truly executing it in the classroom is a whole different story.
  • neatoday.org
    neatoday.org

    Are We Failing Gifted Students?

    10 minute read
    Sian Babish says:
    Cindy Long shares the story of 14-year-old C.J. Wilson, an intellectually gifted student whose success was limited at school. C.J. was far more advanced in middle school, and Long says the district and legislation failed him by not providing more advanced instruction. This is a real wake-up call and (call for help) so school officials begin to provide resources for students like C.J.