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Cross-Curricular

It's Not Just Black & White: Working With Color Blind Students in Your Classroom

"There may be a color blind student in your class, but perhaps neither you nor the student is aware. How do you spot color blindness in students, and what can you do? This collection will help to expand your knowledge on the condition, and help you recognize ways to improve your classroom for color blind students. As a color blind person myself, this is near and dear to my heart!"
A Collection By Sian Babish
  • 8 Collection Items
  • 8 Collection Items
  • Discussion
It's Not Just Black & White: Working With Color Blind Students in Your Classroom
  • forbes.com
    forbes.com

    Can These Glasses Really Fix Color Blindness? We Put Them To The Test

    10 minute read
    Sian Babish says:
    Seth Porges, a contributor to Forbes, reviewed the color blindness-correcting EnChroma eyewear in 2015. Porges and his brother, both of whom have mild deuteranomaly, both said the glasses made most objects look much more vibrant. He says brick walls, previous brown, finally looked red to him! I was most interested in the video embedded in this article, where a father of three is overwhelmed after he tries on the EnChroma glasses!
  • Sian Babish says:
    These are tips for teachers with color blind students. It shows that slight modifications in the classroom, such as labeling art supplies or using white paper can make all the difference. Number 7 is the most important, where it encourages the teacher to educate all students on what color blindness really is. I think that would be a fantastic conversation piece to begin a science lesson on light or the anatomy of the eye!
  • Sian Babish says:
    Do you think you might be color blind? Color-Blindness.com has five unofficial online tests you can check out. The first of five tests is the Ishihara plates, most recognized for its disc of dots and numbers. Try these for fun, but remember, only a licensed physician can truly diagnose color blindness. It was interesting to learn there were so many tests out there!
  • kars4kids.org
    kars4kids.org

    Color-Blindness in the Classroom: Is it a Learning Disability?

    5 minute read
    Sian Babish says:
    Varda Epstein’s blog post raises the question whether color blindness is a learning disability. In fact, since color blindness is not officially listed as a disability, Epstein is in favor of legislation to include it. She also discusses its prevalence of misdiagnosis as other learning or developmental disabilities as well. I love how her bottom line is for parents to get their children tested for color blindness by first grade.
  • Sian Babish says:
    BuzzFeedBlue spoke to a few color blind individuals (young men and women) about their unique personal experiences. This is a short, upbeat testimonial video, but it’s interesting to see how many of the same questions color blind individuals receive on a regular basis. Being color blind myself, I could relate to the “what color is this?” game! It also touches upon the unique nature of color blindness, where the color deficiency experiences can vastly differ between people.
  • Sian Babish says:
    Dr. Gupta begins this helpful post by addressing the difference between color blindness and achromatopsia (rare form of color blindness where people only see shades of gray). I found Dr. Gupta’s description of both conditions to be very articulate, so it can be used for explaining it to children and adults alike. Most importantly, the post points out how certain colors of chalk or marker used on the blackboard or whiteboard may not be readable to color blind students.
  • fastcodesign.com
    fastcodesign.com

    A Teenager Redesigns The Web For The Color Blind

    5 minute read
    Sian Babish says:
    Animesh Tripathi, embarked on a mission to optimize digital content for color blind individuals. Watch how Tripathi experiments with different algorithms to allow for adjustments to color schemes. He shares an in-depth PowerPoint presentation explaining his research and findings. I loved how he shared his motivation for the project—the fact that his own red-green color blindness prevented him from enlisting in the Indian Air Force. Now that is a positive, proactive spin on the situation!
  • Sian Babish says:
    The non-profit education company from the U.K., Colour Blind Awareness, hosts this great page for primary school teachers with color blind students. It provides two key stages in identifying students with possible color deficiencies. I was pleased to see geography maps, board games, and color-driven activities mentioned as very revealing. The page also points out how color blindness plays a role in every subject or class, so it is important to communicate with other faculty members.
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BloomBoard Asks:How have you applied ideas from this collection to your classroom?