Upper Elementary
Cross-Curricular

Strike the Set! Finding the Best Seating Arrangement

This is a collection aimed at helping you find the best seating arrangement for your 3rd, 4th, or 5th grade classroom. Here you will see a variety of seating arrangements, some research on the impact of standing desks, and how placing students in the right place can help them to excel. Your classroom is ready for a face lift!
A Collection By Sian Babish
  • 8 Collection Items
  • 8 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Strike the Set! Finding the Best Seating Arrangement
  • ww2.kqed.org
    ww2.kqed.org

    How Standing Desks Can Help Students Focus in the Classroom

    10 minute read
    Sian Babish says:
    Standing desks are being embraced by not only the workforce, but also by some schools. Holly Korbey discusses the impact of standing on learning. She provides a case study by Texas A&M in favor of standing, but also presents the opposition, such as occupational therapist, Angela Hansom. I was happy to see pictures of various types of standing desks on this article, including ones that can be used at home.
  • Sian Babish says:
    SERGE posted this useful article on building successful classroom layouts to include students with wheelchairs or limited mobility. I love that communication drives this resource, particularly between fellow educators and with students in wheelchairs. Finding the best arrangement is trial and error, but SERGE cites that having as many voices involve in the process is the key to success
  • Sian Babish says:
    Stephanie McAdam shares pictures for crate seating around a carpet. McAdam also shares her other “seat hacks” for the classroom, such as using electrical tape to designate personal space at multi-student tables. I love how she customizes her seating arrangements, and I can imagine students get a kick out of it too!
  • Sian Babish says:
    At the end of the day, the seating arrangement serves a purpose, right? NGSS Life Science provides a seating strategy to work with, as well as functional diagrams. It takes into consideration IEP and 504 plans, which may affect the seating of certain students. I found this really helpful when “varying” a room, so that students with different levels of interaction can engage and motivate one another to participate more.
  • dummies.com
    dummies.com

    Rookie Teaching Technique: Choosing a Seating Arrangement

    10 minute read
    Sian Babish says:
    New teachers not only get new students, but finally receive a classroom of their own. This article helps the “rookie teacher” own his or her new space. The “dance floor seating” discussed by the author, W. Michael Kelly, is an awesome arrangement for a small class. Kelly also brings to life the importance of how the teacher will move about the room when passing back papers and working individually with students. I am more aware of how I navigate my own classroom now!
  • Sian Babish says:
    This is a rare and important topic in the classroom seating conversation: what to do with empty seats! Bill Pellowe, Kevin Ryan, and Robert Chartrand’s podcast can help troubleshoot this issue in your classroom. The idea of “incentivizing” sitting in the empty seats up front is such a fantastic solution to the problem. This is a must-read for any teachers in a classroom with extra space, empty seats, or absent students.
  • Sian Babish says:
    Angela Watson lists the four most popular desk arrangements and seating plans for grade-school students. The best part of this article is that each arrangement is accompanied by pictures as well as pros and cons. I like that she mentions the class size as well, because that plays a large role in classroom logistics.
  • Sian Babish says:
    If we’re talking about seating arrangements, let’s talk chairs, specifically musical chairs! This is a fun lesson plan used Miss Sporn of South Australia. When the music stops, students sit down in the chair and read the book placed upon it. I love how Miss Sporn actually brought the chairs and books outside—watch the video. It is truly remarkable watching students engage with music, literature, and even a little bit of exercise!
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