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The Problem-Posing Method: Is It for Your Classroom?

The Problem-Posing Method by Paulo Friere is one of the most well-known teaching methods, especially in the open-conversation environment of the 21st century. If you want to learn more about bringing Problem-Posing into your classroom, check out this great collection. This is my favorite method of teaching!
A Collection By Sian Babish
  • 9 Collection Items
  • 9 Collection Items
  • Discussion
The Problem-Posing Method: Is It for Your Classroom?
  • emis.de
    emis.de

    SUPPORTING TEACHERS ON DESIGNING PROBLEM-POSING TASKS AS A TOOL OF ASSESSMENT TO UNDERSTAND STUDENTS

    15 minute read
    Sian Babish says:
    This research paper authored by Pi-Jen Win of National Hsin-Chu Teachers College (Taiwan) provides support to teachers looking to reform their teaching methods to integrate Problem-Posing. Win uses a math class as an example, where writing open-ended questions is the focal point. I like Win’s notion that teachers watching students work through these tasks can help construct a much deeper assessment of student comprehension.
  • Sian Babish says:
    This image of Teddy Roosevelt features his famous quote about what to do with a problem. It’s a simple, one-sentence graphic that has a place in every Problem-Posing classroom. I love this quote, because it speaks to the very heart of a problem: solve it! I bet this would kick start a great class discussion.
  • Sian Babish says:
    The Problem-Posing theory is a hot debate topic in this discussion, where commenters bring the pros and cons to light. The conversation also illustrates different examples of Problem-Posing, which is interesting because it’s not as simple as “open discussion” in class. The best part about this thread is that it’s very civil and written quite formally, so it’s a very professional, enjoyable debate.
  • Sian Babish says:
    Edc.org presents a printable PDF guide to adapt questions to the Problem-Posing method. Driven by a comprehensive research project on methodology, this guide is detailed with explanation and examples of writing up new problems from old ones. There are also scattered internal links to different types of Problem-Posing lesson plans as well. I love the idea that old questions can be revived and updated to reflect a more conversation-driven solution in class.
  • Sian Babish says:
    ReadWriteThink.org shares this lesson plan for the story, Sixteen Cows, where students have the opportunity to brainstorm and explore “what if” scenarios. There are printable worksheets, such as one split between observations and “what if” extensions, such as what would happen if the number of cows were to change. I love how Math and Language Arts can be covered in this lesson plan, especially by means of students really using their imaginations for this one.
  • northeastern.edu
    northeastern.edu

    Closing the Gap: An Essay Pertaining to Paulo Freire's Ideal Education System

    8 minute read
    Sian Babish says:
    Sage Witham writes this blog post for the of Northeastern University’s Writing Program Journal. He explains his exposure to both the Banking Concept and Problem-Posing, cited he benefitted more from the latter. Witham is critical of the role of the teacher with the Banking Concept, and queries whether students can truly learn critical thinking in this model. I was fascinated by Witham’s perspective as the student of the Problem-Posing method, because he views it as invaluably advantageous.
  • Sian Babish says:
    Trevor Calkins shows math problems written (and solved) by second grade students. The math problem is written on one side of a card, and solved the same student on the back of the card. Calkins explains how exercises like these in second grade help students to progress in analytical and contextual thinking. I loved seeing the cards in the students’ handwriting, because it really makes this exercise real and possible in the classroom.
  • Sian Babish says:
    Even at $26.00 on Amazon.com, this book can prove invaluable to Early Childhood and Language Arts teachers. Quintero’s book explains how to adapt Problem-Posing into class at a young age, and to ELL and ESL students. I like the breakdown of examples in the book, with listening, dialogue, and then action. It make simple what seems to be complicated, and streamlines it for instruction.
  • Sian Babish says:
    Paulo Freire’s famous essay, “The Banking Concept of Education,” is available in this printable PDF. The essay takes issue with the banking concept, which is described as more transaction-based as opposed to interactive and intuitive. Freire then champions Problem-Posing education, where students focus on “becoming” (Pg. 252). This essay changed my view on the way I teach, and also the way I think about teaching, so I recommend this to everyone.