High School
Health

Mental Illness and Stigma

Mental illness can be a tough topic. I frame this lesson around the social stigma of all mental illness and then follow with lessons on depression and anxiety. Please review each of these materials carefully to determine if they are appropriate for the maturity level of your students. My learning objectives focus around awareness rather than preparing them to support a loved one with mental illness. My depression and anxiety units do more with how to be a good friend, when to seek help, etc.
A Collection By Teresa Potter
  • 5 Collection Items
  • 5 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Mental Illness and Stigma
  • Teresa Potter says:
    This lesson does an excellent job to introducing students to the concepts of mental illness and stigma. This lesson, paired with the Stigma and Mental Illness video provide an appropriate lesson for all high school students that you can them take into the more difficult topics with the other resources for older students.
  • Teresa Potter says:
    The National Alliance of Mental Illness provides a framework for someone to take a pledge to learn about mental health rather than to perpetuate the stigma. I don't ever require my students to take the pledge, but I bring it to their attention to show them what steps they can take to help end stigma.
  • Teresa Potter says:
    This is a very accessible video for any high school student. It takes a very objective look at what people with mental illness experience in society and as part of the health care system. Of all the resources in this collection I would say this one is the most introductory level in terms of required maturity. It is great to use in a 9th or 10th grade health class as an introduction to this topic, or as part of a larger unit with more mature students.
  • Teresa Potter says:
    I made this webquest as part of my master's program to help guide students through learning about a specific mental illness. The conclusion ask them to formulate an idea of how to relate to a loved one with mental illness, but all information on how to help that loved one points towards getting them professional help. This activity is most appropriate for an in-class activity where the teacher can walk around and scaffold students as they work.
  • Teresa Potter says:
    This video is a raw look at what mental illness looks like in real life. The speaker doesn't hold back in explaining the double standard of those who are mentally ill and those who have physical illness, and this can be upsetting for some students. However, with careful scaffolding this is a powerful example of why we must work to change the stigma associated with mental illness.
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