Middle School
Cross-Curricular

Constructivism: Learning by Experience

Ever wanted to keep your students engaged and have them particulate in their own learning? Try grounding your next lesson in constructivism. Constructionist theory suggests that people construct their own understanding and knowledge through experiencing things and reflecting on those experiences and works wonders in keeping your students engaged. Learn how to use constructivist theory in your lessons with the following tips.
A Collection By AD McDaniel
  • 5 Collection Items
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Constructivism: Learning by Experience
  • AD McDaniel says:
    Take this workshop to learn everything about constructivist theory: what it is, how it differs from a traditional classroom experience, and its benefits to your students.
  • AD McDaniel says:
    To see how constructivism can be applied successfully to a classroom, check out this video of a teacher putting constructivism into action.
  • AD McDaniel says:
    Every instructional decision has its pros and cons, and constructivism is no different. This slideshow provides a nice visual comparison of both the positives and the negatives of using constructivism in your classroom. Use this to help decide if it is right strategy for your students.
  • AD McDaniel says:
    Here are a total of 12 curriculum, instructional, and assessment constructivist practices that you can include in your instruction right now. You can include all of them in your lessons or include the practices in just the areas that you feel will be most impactful for your students.
  • AD McDaniel says:
    Watch an in-depth example of a teacher incorporating the 5E's model of constructivism in her middle school lesson: engagement, exploration, explanation, elaboration, and evaluation.
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BloomBoard Asks:How have you applied constructivism in your lessons?