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Discipline Database: Positive Methods to Use When Under Pressure

Managing the discipline of difficult students is one of the hardest parts of being a teacher. You need to assess the child's physical, emotional, and psychological state quickly and mete an appropriate reaction and consequence. These resources will assist you with strategies that you can utilize in those heated moments when a quick decision is essential, and a positive outcome is desired.
A Collection By Alexis Roesser
  • 6 Collection Items
  • 6 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Discipline Database: Positive Methods to Use When Under Pressure
  • homepages.wmich.edu
    homepages.wmich.edu

    Understanding and Working with Students and Adults From Poverty

    Article
    Alexis Roesser says:
    Ruby Payne, an expert on generational poverty, outlines some of the "hidden" rules of the middle class that may not be obvious to students who do not come from the same circumstances. She clearly defines why students may feel insecure, act impulsively, or do not know how to mediate a conflict on their own. If you are trying to create discipline strategies for students who come from generational poverty, you need to understand these crucial bedrocks.
  • Alexis Roesser says:
    If you find a successful middle school teacher who has a handle on discipline, their tips and techniques are invaluable. If you can tackle this age group, you can do anything! This teacher supplies several ideas for dealing with disruptive students and how to maximize instructional time and minimize time spent in the office.
  • Alexis Roesser says:
    The blog post focuses on one of the most important parts of a quality discipline system: your relationship with the kids. Students who feel a connection to their teacher are less likely to misbehave, and quicker to respond to correction than those who feel alienated. Following the suggestions in this blog will help prevent issues before they begin.
  • Alexis Roesser says:
    The PBIS tiered model categorizes students into 3 levels of behavior infractions, and uses data analysis to determine if the behavior infractions are happening at a certain time of day, month, or location. The PBIS team can then try to determine the root cause of these behaviors, and supplement a positive reinforcement before the behavior occurs. PBIS is typically a school-wide system, so this may be an opportunity for you to introduce a highly successful program to your building.
  • Alexis Roesser says:
    Brian Mendler was a self-proclaimed "difficult student," which makes his perspective on discipline unique and refreshing. He articulates where his desire to misbehave in class came from, and contrasts the reactions he received as a child with ones he uses in his current classroom. Filled with ready-to-use techniques, this book should be a staple for all educators looking to improve and understand the genesis of their students' behavior.
  • Alexis Roesser says:
    One of the key points of this book is that you cannot discipline all students in the same manner; you may need to employ different tactics with different children based on their personality, background, and needs. The methods presented in this book discuss how you can offer a consequence versus a punishment, and also not be tied to a rigid discipline system that may not work in all circumstances.