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English Language Arts

Black Girl Magic: Best Literacy Practices/Books

Representation of girls and young women of color has increased dramatically in the past few decades. Studies show that despite these efforts to include all women of color, such characters are still under-represented in children and adult literature. Educators often struggle in identifying quality texts to use in their multicultural classrooms. This collection provides a number of resources— from books with multicultural female protagonists, to guides which aide in the integration of these texts.
A Collection By Ambar Paulino
  • 6 Collection Items
  • 6 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Black Girl Magic: Best Literacy Practices/Books
  • Ambar Paulino says:
    A list of books collected by 11-year-old Marley Dias. Books in this collection are unique in the sense that black girls are the characters in the book and not background/minor characters. There are 721 books in this collection and most are rated on a scale of 1-5 (stars) by users on GoodReads.com. Top three books in this collection include: ‘Brown Girl Dreaming’ by Jacqueline Woodson, ‘Kindred’ by Octavia E. Butler., and One Crazy Summer (Series), by Rita Williams-Garcia.
  • Ambar Paulino says:
    This blog entry highlights two different books- ‘The Happiness Dress’ and ‘Abigail’s Glorious Hair’, both authored by Diane Browne, a Jamaican author. Diane Browne’s stories have been published in the U.K., Jamaica, and U.S.A., and are internationally recognized for their representation of Caribbean culture. The blog itself- celebrates Caribbean culture and literature and features other Caribbean authors (children’s stories).
  • Ambar Paulino says:
    A comprehensive list of non-fiction and historical fiction books which guide conversation about Black History “beyond the 28 days of Black History month. This list was curated by editors at ForHarriet.com lists books by age groups and provides a short synapsis of each book. Some of the top-rated books on this list include: ‘Barack Obama: Son of Promise, Child of Hope’ by Nikki Grimes (4-8), ‘Through My Eyes’ by Ruby Bridges (8-12), and ‘Warriors Don’t Cry’ by Melba Pattillo Beales.
  • Ambar Paulino says:
    Another comprehensive list of books for “black and brown girls” created by Christina Fonthes. “In an effort to instill some self-love into her and tear her away from her Blackberry, I decided to buy my sister books and DVDs where black women and girls are protagonists, heroes/heroines as opposed to the magical negro.” Notable books in this list include: ‘Half of a Yellow Sun’ and ‘Purple Hibiscus’ by Chimamanda N. Adichie. I encourage educators to use these specific books in empowerment clubs.
  • Ambar Paulino says:
    A resource guide created to accompany the #1000BlackGirlBooks movement. The guide includes a searchable database of 4,000+ Black Girl Books (divided by the different reading levels— Adult, Emerging, Independent, Visual, Young Adult reader). Reading tips for parents and educators, an introduction from the President of the GrassROOTS Community Foundation and Marley Dias.
  • Ambar Paulino says:
    This literature review provides an in-depth look at the literatures available for children and young women of color. According to the introduction, [the article] “provides a review of literature of Black girl literacies by examining historical, theoretical, and empirical research conducted across the past several decades.” The article also highlights literacy practices for best implementation of educational pedagogies for Black women and girls.
BloomBoard SparkOther Cross-Curricular
BloomBoard Asks:What literacy practices are you implementing in your reading/writing classrooms to best engage students (women, young girls) of color?