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Cross-Curricular

Social Justice in the Classroom

How can educators create an unbiased social justice learning environment? What does social justice in the classroom actually imply? With growing racial tensions around the country, it is important to give students a safe space where they can discuss and voice their opinions on current events. This collection prepares educators to tackle worldly issues in the social justice classroom. It provides several “How-to” guide discussions, documentaries, and a model lesson for interested educators.
A Collection By Ambar Paulino
  • 6 Collection Items
  • 6 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Social Justice in the Classroom
  • Ambar Paulino says:
    A simplified list of 10 suggestions published by the Morning Side Center for Teaching Social Responsibility which tackle issues in “constructive, thoughtful, and sensitive ways.” Each point includes a short description of how they pan out during the conversations on social justice. The guidelines were adapted by a piece that appeared on the New York Times Learning Network. Excellent for educators seeking to engage students on current events through simple conversation.
  • edutopia.org
    edutopia.org

    Creating Classrooms for Social Justice

    Article
    Ambar Paulino says:
    This blog post which originally appeared on Edutopia lists a number of strategies educators can adapt in courses which explore topics of social justice and race. The posts breaks down basic classroom practices that educators should implement at all levels when teaching social justice in core subjects — History, English, etc. The post encourages teachers to have students link real-world problems and look at multiple perspective to create unbiased and informed opinions.
  • Ambar Paulino says:
    A model lesson for students in grades 6-12 which encourages participants to recognize the idea of individual/group identities. This particular lesson plan should help students “explore some difficulties that may arise for people whose identities includes words like ‘transgender’ or ‘immigrant” and uses media literacy to prone important discussions of what identity means to different individuals based on their personal history.
  • Ambar Paulino says:
    This short introduction provides an outline for teachers seeking to create classrooms that are based on “equity and social justice.” The introduction argues that curriculum and classroom practices in such environments should be critical, multicultural, experiential, visionary and culturally sensitive. Authors provide an in-depth explanation of what each of these bullet points mean. Check out this resource if you’d like to create a culturally competent learning environment.
  • Ambar Paulino says:
    If you are an educator looking to create a culturally-competent learning environment, this resource outlines the National Curriculum Standards in the SS classroom. The NCSS outlines the thematic strands of teaching social justice in the SS class. These themes include: culture, time, continuity, environments, individual development/identity, power, authority/governance, distribution/consumption, science/technology, global connections and lastly, civic ideals/practices.
  • Ambar Paulino says:
    An hour long-documentary featured by the PBS network that looks at modern-day school-segregation. This is an excellent resource for educators looking to teach students about education equity/inequalities that plague communities and ultimately affect children and young adults around the nation. Useful for teachers looking to engage students in discussion about the racial divide in American schools during the 1960s and now.
BloomBoard SparkOther Cross-Curricular
BloomBoard Asks:How can you create a classroom environment that encourages discussions about racial inequalities/other injustices while remaining unbiased? Are there any conversation starting questions/prompts you find that gets your students to speak on their personal opinions?