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A Teacher's Guide to WordPress.com and WordPress.org

You've probably heard of the content management system, WordPress. Notice that I didn't say the "blogging platform"? There's a big difference between WordPress.com and WordPress.org. Both are great for teacher sites and blogs, but one (.org) is much more flexible, but also more complex than the other. This collection will help you understand both platforms, so you can decide which will work best for you.
A Collection By Amelia Franz
  • 7 Collection Items
  • 7 Collection Items
  • Discussion
A Teacher's Guide to WordPress.com and WordPress.org
  • Amelia Franz says:
    What better place to learn about WordPress than the WordPress site itself? This page gives you an accurate, succinct rundown of the differences between .com and .org.
  • Amelia Franz says:
    wpmudev is one of the top sites for all things WordPress, so if you want a detailed, specific comparison of the two platforms, this article will give you all the information you probably need. If you're technical, or maybe just curious, there are tons of learning resources on the technical aspects of WordPress on the site.
  • Amelia Franz says:
    If you're wondering how WordPress could be used in a school, this brief presentation will give you some ideas (school site, blended learning, resource repository). Actually, it can also be used for online courses.
  • Amelia Franz says:
    Teacher and techie, Kim Shivler shares her experiences using WordPress in the classroom, in this recorded talk from a WordCamp. WordCamp, by the way, is the conference for WordPress enthusiasts.
  • smartbrief.com
    smartbrief.com

    Rewards of teaching young children to blog

    5 minute read
    Amelia Franz says:
    If you've decided that all you need is a blogging platform, rather than a self-hosted WordPress.org site, this article from veteran teacher Linda Yollis explains how student blogging helps their literacy skills and includes parents in the learning. It was written in 2012, so blogging has evolved, but I included it in this collection because it is focused on learning benefits, rather than the technology itself.
  • Amelia Franz says:
    If you've decided to dive straight into the deep end with a self-hosted WordPress site, this list of plugins (only available for .org, the self-hosted version) might help you find an e-learning solution if you ever want to create an online course for your students.
  • Amelia Franz says:
    This is one of the most trusted and authoritative sites for tutorials for WordPress beginners. Now, be aware that "beginner" is a relative term. Not all the content is aimed at absolute beginners. In fact, I'd say it's also relevant for advanced beginners and intermediate WordPress users. I've built many self-hosted WordPress sites, and I assure you that wpbeginner.com is one of the best tutorial sites around.
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BloomBoard Asks:Have you used WordPress.com or even WordPress.org for your teaching? If so, which resources were the most helpful in getting you started?