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Cross-Curricular

Agile Education

For years, software development teams have used a process called Agile Development to bring their products to production. Among its four key values are, “Responding to change over following a plan.” Can its principles be applied to the classroom? This collection will help you understand what it’s all about.
A Collection By Amelia Franz
  • 7 Collection Items
  • 7 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Agile Education
  • Amelia Franz says:
    Chris Barnes, Principal of an Arizona elementary school, explains how agile education works at his school. He describes classes where students are divided into scrum teams to work on problems in a way that will prepare them for lifelong learning.
  • Amelia Franz says:
    The fundamental conception of power shared by proponents of agile learning is captured in this infographic. Power is not something to be traded back and forth between teacher and student, but should be given to the “learning relationship” itself. This will empower the entire class, which in turn benefits both teacher and student.
  • Amelia Franz says:
    This Google Plus community site has helpful resources on Agile and Scrum in the classroom. I thought the “21st Century Skills Cards” were interesting. Communication, creativity, productivity, social skills, and flexibility were among those listed, and these are the qualities Agile learning can develop in students.
  • bit.ly
    bit.ly

    Cracking The Code To Teams: What Educators Can Learn From Programmers (EdSurge News)

    6 minute read
    Amelia Franz says:
    An educational consultant and former middle-school math teacher outlines how a typical sprint might work in a math class. She breaks the sprint down into individual weeks, discussing “daily deliverables” that the students are responsible for providing. Each group appoints a Scrum Master, who will be in charge of the daily stand-ups.
  • Amelia Franz says:
    Hope High in Phoenix implemented Agile Education and Scrum throughout their school. The Principal and a teacher explained in this interview, how students became empowered by increased ownership of projects and learning. I admire their willingness to make changes and trust their students as full partners in the process.
  • edut.to
    edut.to

    The Agile Classroom

    5 minute read
    Amelia Franz says:
    This article applies the main ideas of agile development to the classroom. Being agile and nimble means being willing to adjust your curriculum when needed, and “knowing your people” means figuring out how to use individual strengths to help the entire class. The underlying message is that teaching should be fluid, rather than fixed.
  • bit.ly
    bit.ly

    Agile Based Learning: What Is It and How Can It Change Education?

    7 minute read
    Amelia Franz says:
    Sprint? Stand-Up? User Stories? If none of these terms sound familiar, it’s because they’re part of the agile software development process. This article explains the “Agile Schools Manifesto.” I like the sound of “meaningful learning over the measurement of learning."