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English Language Arts

Are Mandatory Reading Logs a Bad Idea?

According to a new article in The Atlantic, kids are spending less time reading books these days, and more time on screens. Understandably, this worries teachers and researchers. Enter the mandatory reading log, designed to make sure kids spend a few minutes, at least, reading books every day. This collection explores the pros and cons of reading logs.
A Collection By Amelia Franz
  • 8 Collection Items
  • 8 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Are Mandatory Reading Logs a Bad Idea?
  • Amelia Franz says:
    Teacher and author Pernille Ripp explains how she determines whether or not her students are reading at home without assigning mandatory reading logs. It's obvious to me, after spending a bit of time on her blog, that she is able to do this because she is genuinely interested in what her students are reading and their reactions to the reading.
  • you-log.com
    you-log.com

    TO LOG, OR NOT TO LOG? The pros & cons of school reading logs

    5 minute read
    Amelia Franz says:
    Teacher and Software Developer Mark Butler’s post strikes me as a very sensible and innovative way to handle the mandatory reading issue with students. Not only does he make book logs optional, but he has developed an app so that students can scan the barcode of a book, and the bibliographic information will be retrieved from Amazon and stored.
  • thecornerstoneforteachers.com
    thecornerstoneforteachers.com

    10 authentic ways to hold students accountable for home reading

    7 minute read
    Amelia Franz says:
    From this list, I especially like numbers one (replacing reading blogs with book journals) and nine (okay not to finish a book you don't like, and you should record the information about why you couldn’t "get into it.")
  • alfiekohn.org
    alfiekohn.org

    How to Create Nonreaders

    10 minute read
    Amelia Franz says:
    The title of this article by parenting writer Alfie Kohn says it all. Can you guess what’s number one on his list? If you guessed something like "Quantify Their Reading Assignments," pat yourself on the back. You’re correct. He also includes a list of ways to give students more choice and power, which should help them invest more deeply in the reading.
  • Amelia Franz says:
    A 2014 study from Scholastic and YouGov attempted to learn just how, and how much, kids today are reading. The study is printed here. It's very well organized, and divided into logical sections for reading at home, reading at school, and what kids want in books. You can download reports and infographics.
  • Room 16- The Thinking Classroom

    Website Blog
    room16thethinkingclassroom.blogspot.com
    room16thethinkingclassroom.blogspot.com
    Amelia Franz says:
    Hold on, now. Let's not forget that every coin has two sides, and reading logs are no exception. In this teaching blog post, a California reading teacher offers a thoughtful and practical defense of the mandatory reading log. She is very aware of the research on this issue, but she uses reading logs _x0015_in more open- ended ways
  • Amelia Franz says:
    This is a link to the main study cited by Dr. Reischer in "Can Reading Logs Ruin Reading For Kids?” You'll have to scroll down to find it because this PDF includes the entire issue of the 2012 issue of Journal of _x0016_Research in Education, the journal in which the study was published.
  • theatlantic.com
    theatlantic.com

    Do Reading Logs Ruin Reading?

    5 minute read
    Amelia Franz says:
    Psychologist Erica Reischer draws our attention, in this recent The Atlantic article, to research that should make us all think carefully about assigning mandatory reading logs to our students. "Compelling children to read may improve their reading skills . . . but mandated reading does not bring the same benefits as when children themselves choose to read,” she concludes in the final paragraph.