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The Importance of Classroom Layout

The layout of your classroom can have a big influence on student behavior and, consequently, learning. This collection will give you tools to plan the arrangement of your classroom, as well as research and advice to help you understand what kind of layout would work best for your classes.
A Collection By Amelia Franz
  • 9 Collection Items
  • 9 Collection Items
  • Discussion
The Importance of Classroom Layout
  • edut.to
    edut.to

    2 Quick, Inexpensive Ways to Add Collaborative Space to Your Classroom

    4 minute read
    Amelia Franz says:
    New Jersey teacher Kevin Jarrett transformed his classroom by using Idea Paint on a classroom wall, turning it into a huge whiteboard. He also built a rolling, two-sided whiteboard with a garment rack, wood, and whiteboard paint. I love his ideas!
  • bit.ly
    bit.ly

    Blueprint for New Research: Classroom Design and Achievement

    5 minute read
    Amelia Franz says:
    Until recently, research on student achievement rarely focused on the role architecture and environment plays. This journal article explains that new areas of research will explore the link between neuroscience, education, and classroom design.
  • Amelia Franz says:
    Try this! It's a useful online tool that allows you to choose the shape of your classroom, then drag-and-drop teacher and students desks, and even individual students, in order to try out various arrangements. I think this could be helpful, not only at the beginning of the year but as a way to deal with behavior and motivation problems when they arise.
  • bit.ly
    bit.ly

    The Latest Trends in Classroom Design

    5 minute read
    Amelia Franz says:
    This article stresses the need for flexibility in classroom setup, rather than fixed spaces. Moveable furniture suggests to students that their learning itself is meaningful and adaptable. Be sure to check out the slideshow of well-designed classrooms. Most of the furniture shown is not available in public schools, but the layouts could be used as a springboard for your ideas.
  • Amelia Franz says:
    “You can’t expect children to learn 21st-century skills in schools built for the 1950s. . . ," begins this influential book. The author urges a new outlook on schools, beginning with designing for students’ basic needs, physical movement, collaboration, and connectivity with the world. The photos show the ugliness and inadequacy of existing buildings. This book will make you really think about your classroom and school's design.
  • Amelia Franz says:
    Mrs. Wojcicki contrasts the physical arrangement of her classrooms at the beginning of her career, with her current layout of desks and other classroom furniture. Amazingly, she teaches eighty students in one of her classes and attributes her students’ high engagement to the physical layout of the room.
  • Amelia Franz says:
    In this video, a high school English teacher from Virginia sets up the desks in her classroom to promote interaction, while maximizing her access to students. She argues that classroom layout can “make a good teacher a great teacher” by increasing her ability to communicate with each of her students.
  • bit.ly
    bit.ly

    A Learning Space That Works

    4 minute read
    Amelia Franz says:
    Allyson Daley, a first-grade teacher at P.S. 321 in Brooklyn, New York, explains several features of her class layout that she believes are helping her students learn well.
  • bit.ly
    bit.ly

    Rethinking the Classroom

    8 minute read
    Amelia Franz says:
    A traditional classroom is contrasted, in this article, with a “learning studio.” What’s the difference between the two? A learning studio is comfortable, inviting, and conducive to interaction and learning. It encourages collaborative problem-solving, which will be extremely important for our learners in college and the workplace.