High School
Cross-Curricular

Introducing High School Students to Cybersecurity

Exploring cybersecurity basics with students can introduce them to the possibility of a well-paying career choice, while also teaching them how to keep their data safer online. In addition, students can learn the difference between ethical and unethical hacking. Whether you offer cybersecurity education as curricular or extra-curricular, it's a great way to prepare students for the future.
A Collection By Amelia Franz
  • 9 Collection Items
  • 9 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Introducing High School Students to Cybersecurity
  • Competition Overview

    Website
    uscyberpatriot.org
    uscyberpatriot.org
    Amelia Franz says:
    If you think your school might be interested in forming a team to compete against other high schools in a realistic cybersecurity scenario (finding and fixing security vulnerabilities in operating systems), this page is the place to start.
  • bit.ly
    bit.ly

    Hacker High: Why We Need to Teach Hacking in Schools

    5 minute read
    Amelia Franz says:
    According to Ron Woerner, a cybersecurity expert, most teens only know "point-and-click" technology. This is not enough, he warns. He also claims that they are not keeping their data safe online. Woerner believes that high school would be a great time to introduce cybersecurity to students by teaching them ethical "hacking" skills.
  • nyti.ms
    nyti.ms

    Luring Young Web Warriors is Priority. It's Also a Game

    5 minute read
    Amelia Franz says:
    This article explains the U.S. government's great concern that we are not producing enough "cyber warriors" to keep America's infrastructure and data safe from hackers. Because of this concern, a number of competitions and challenges have been created, to encourage teens to get involved in learning about cybersecurity and consider it as a career choice.
  • Amelia Franz says:
    This is an extended lesson plan that would take several class periods to work through. It includes research assignments on recent, high-profile data breaches and group presentations where the students share their findings. They also learn about password authentication and network security. Suggestions are given for extension activities beyond the scope of the lesson. These include exploring online privacy.
  • Amelia Franz says:
    This organization's goal is to encourage more girls to choose cybersecurity for their careers. They hold workshops, where girls work in teams to learn about cryptography, cell phone forensics, and other topics. The headquarters is in central Maryland, but workshops have also been held in Michigan, Kansas, California, Ohio, and Hawaii. Information
  • Amelia Franz says:
    This is a very slick, well-designed, and appealing game/simulation designed to introduce students to some of the challenges cybersecurity professionals face. The video introduction does a great job of explaining the internet and the difficulty in securing all its information. The educator guide will help you to feel confident in leading your students through this exercise. It looks really fun! I'll bet your students would love it.
  • Amelia Franz says:
    Hacker High is a curriculum designed to teach cybersecurity basics to high schoolers. The site consists of a series of lessons. There are opportunities for teens to connect with other teens taking the course, as well as teacher preparation courses.
  • Amelia Franz says:
    This describes a one-week residential program held at colleges around the country, where two teachers and six students from each school experience hands-on challenges and professional development workshops. Teachers lead their students in challenges against other schools, and it is described as an "intense, totally immersive experience."
  • Amelia Franz says:
    This page describes the Education Discovery Forum, an annual, week-long professional development workshop for teachers and administrators who would like to start teaching Cybersecurity to their students.