High School
English Language Arts

Teaching Copyright Law to Students

For today's students, digital literacy is crucial. Knowing how to write a five-paragraph essay and memorize MLA style isn't nearly enough to prepare them to write, publish, and learn online. Understanding coypright law is a part of digital literacy, and students need to know that materials they find online are protected by copyright. This is important for them today and in their adult lives.
A Collection By Amelia Franz
  • 9 Collection Items
  • 9 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Teaching Copyright Law to Students
  • Amelia Franz says:
    This activity seems like a great introduction to the topic of copyright law for middle and high school students. Students begin by taking the quiz to determine what they already know about the topic. They then explore copyright issues using various media, both print and online.
  • Amelia Franz says:
    You probably won't need to justify teaching your students about copyright, but if you ever do, it doesn't get much clearer than this. Under "Production and Distribution of Writing," the guidelines state that students should use technology to "produce, publish, and update individual and shared writing projects . . . " Learning how to protect their own works and use the works of others appropriately is an important element of online publishing.
  • bit.ly
    bit.ly

    Why Every Student Should Learn the Skills of a Journalist

    3 minute read
    Amelia Franz says:
    This article is an interview with an English teacher at Palo Alto High School who believes students need to be taught relevant, contemporary digital media skills in English class. She argues that, like journalists, students are gathering a great deal of information, but don't know how to make good use of it. Some of the skills she cites as key to their future success are knowing how to search effectively, distinguishing between fact and opinion, blogging, and understanding copyright law.
  • bit.ly
    bit.ly

    Getty Images says it's trying to ease up on enforcing copyright

    5 minute read
    Amelia Franz says:
    Using a tool that tracks down images wherever they appear on the web, Getty Images sent thousands of invoices to blog/site owners, demanding payment for use of the images. If the bloggers refused to pay, they were threatened with lawsuits. These tools are now commonly used, which means the days of "not getting caught" for using an image without permission are over. You can use this as a cautionary tale to your students who might be downloading and using images for non-educational purposes.
  • Amelia Franz says:
    Pexels is a great source for professional-quality photography licensed under Creative Commons Zero license. Be sure to check each image's individual license, though, to make sure it reads "Creative Commons Zero" before downloading. This license allows images to be used free for both personal and commercial projects, with no attribution required. This would be a great way to help your students understand the different types of licenses for non-educational projects.
  • Amelia Franz says:
    In about three minutes, this animated video explains for students the exact meaning of Fair Use. It stresses that "the Internet is not a free for all," even if the material is used for educational purposes. The video is very well designed, and will provide clarity to the students about how to know whether they are following Fair Use guidelines for copyrighted work.
  • bit.ly
    bit.ly

    Copyrights and Copying Wrongs: Part 1 of a Series on Copyright and Fair Use

    5 minute read
    Amelia Franz says:
    Have you ever wondered about the resources you and you students freely use for presentations, lectures, and other educational purposes? This article is a "quick and dirty" guide to the basics of using photos, infographics, and other materials in the classroom.
  • Amelia Franz says:
    Your students will already be very familiar with this issue. All of them have probably shared movies and music online. This lesson helps students understand the complex copyright issues surrounding this controversial topic. I think this lesson will be very interesting to high schoolers, because it is directly relevant to their digital lives.
  • bit.ly
    bit.ly

    Digital History: A Guide to Gathering, Preserving, and Presenting the past on the Web

    5 minute read
    Amelia Franz says:
    This article would be excellent background reading for teachers were considering teaching about copyright law. It traces the beginnings of copyright law to the U.S. Constitution, and emphasizes that copyright law is dynamic, and changes over time.