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Teaching Students with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder

Students with FASD suffer global cognitive impairments that make learning, behavior, and emotional regulation extremely difficult. Even the most experienced teachers struggle to help these students learn. Understanding FASD is essential. This collection gives an overview of, and strategies for, working with these students in the classroom.
A Collection By Amelia Franz
  • 8 Collection Items
  • 8 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Teaching Students with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder
  • Amelia Franz says:
    Under "Behavior Management" on the main menu, find the "Teacher Toolbox" page. There are many tools and ideas for managing classroom behavior of students with special needs, as well as tips to deal with Constant Talking, Misunderstanding of Verbal Directions, and Lack of Motivation. Many of these ideas will help students with FASD.
  • Amelia Franz says:
    This video simply allows a young woman to explain how FASD has affected her life. I found it very poignant, and even heartbreaking at times. If you're a high school teacher, you could benefit from watching this video. If you teach any students who remind you of Jasmine, her honest explanations might help you view their struggles in a new light. You will certainly have greater understanding.
  • livescience.com
    livescience.com

    ADHD vs. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome: Kids' Learning Problems Differ

    5 minute read
    Amelia Franz says:
    ADHD and FASD are often viewed as similar conditions because they both cause behavior problems, distractibility, and other symptoms. This article explains that, when it comes to remembering instructions, those with the two conditions are different. This study was purely about memory, but in general, children with ADHD alone generally have better functional outcomes in life.
  • Amelia Franz says:
    This guide is deep, practical, and comprehensive. I think you'll learn a great deal from it. In fact, I think all teachers and administrators who work with these children should be required to read and discuss this pamphlet. There are lots of tips and suggestions that are simple, but not necessarily easy. For instance, "Don't argue with the student about behavior" is spot-on (but not necessarily easy to do).
  • Amelia Franz says:
    To begin to grasp how this disorder affects people both at school and in their homes, read this book. I appreciated the optimistic tone and multiple points of view.
  • uvm.edu
    uvm.edu

    Changing Behaviors by Changing the Classroom Environment

    10 minute read
    Amelia Franz says:
    This article lists ideas for changing the actual classroom space in order to improve behavior. "Before" and "after" pictures illustrate the changes. It doesn't seem to be targeted specifically at FASD, but for classrooms of students with any learning disabilities.
  • Amelia Franz says:
    This video demonstrates, lists, and explains how important classroom routines are for students with FASD. I like the classroom dramatizations that really show how important these routines are to the students. Canada seems to have devoted more effort and resources to teacher education about FASD, and there are many more resources on this site from the Canadian education system.
  • Amelia Franz says:
    Look for this video on the right side of the home page. It makes a really important point, and one that is hard to grasp for most people. Regardless of I.Q., a student with this condition will be emotionally and developmentally younger than his or her peers. Watch this video to learn to recognize possible FASD in your students. The most common sign, in my experience, is a student who does not learn from consequences.