Middle School1 more
Cross-Curricular

Trauma-Sensitivity and De-Escalation in the Classroom

The effects of childhood trauma reduce students' availability for learning and ability to handle stress. When they "explode" in our classrooms, it's vital that we've prepared ourselves to handle the situation. Our own reactions can determine whether the outcome is violent or peaceful. We've all heard stories of children being handcuffed after assaulting teachers. Do you think the outcome might have been different if the teacher had been trained to de-escalate?
A Collection By Amelia Franz
  • 8 Collection Items
  • 8 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Trauma-Sensitivity and De-Escalation in the Classroom
  • lfcc.on.ca
    lfcc.on.ca

    Maltreatment and the Developing Child: How Early Childhood Experience Shapes Child and Culture

    12 minute read
    Amelia Franz says:
    Bruce D. Perry is the well-known child Psychiatrist who authored The Boy Who Was Raised as a Dog: And Other Stories from a Child Psychiatrist's Notebook. Among his patients were the children of the Branch Davidians, the ill-fated cult led by David Koresh in Waco, Texas, in the 1990s. Honestly, the book is hard to read at times. If, however, you want to learn about childhood trauma and how it's treated, this is the place to start.
  • casenex.com
    casenex.com

    Self-Awareness in Working With Students With Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    12 minute read
    Amelia Franz says:
    This is it! In order to handle traumatized, emotionally disturbed students in our classrooms, we absolutely need to do self-examination. We must identify our own "triggers" and learn from our responses (good and bad) to classroom "explosions," or simply disrespectful students who question our authority. This is an excellent, in-depth guide for making sure we are emotionally ready to deal with whatever we encounter in the classroom.
  • Amelia Franz says:
    This resource differentiates symptoms of trauma for elementary, middle school, and high school students. The section "What can be done at school to help a traumatized child?" is relevant to classroom teachers, though we all know that we don't always have as much time for individual students as we'd like.The authors make the important point that when trauma or ongoing abuse is suspected, we should speak to administration/counseling staff.
  • my.optimus-education.com
    my.optimus-education.com

    Using de-escalation techniques effectively

    3 minute read
    Amelia Franz says:
    What I like about this article is that it acknowledges how hard it is, and how unnatural it is, for humans (including teachers) to respond in a calm, detached manner to someone who is screaming, threatening, or simply defying our authority. It cannot be done, says the author, without practice. The sections entitled "Non-Verbal Techniques," "Verbal Strategies," and "Things to Avoid" should be required reading for any new teacher.
  • smartclassroommanagement.com
    smartclassroommanagement.com

    How To Handle An Angry, Verbally Aggressive Student

    5 minute read
    Amelia Franz says:
    This is a simple, straight-to-the-point contrast between ineffective and effective ways to respond to angry, traumatized students acting out in the classroom. It's hard to respond calmly, or say nothing at all, when a student is cursing at you. According to this article, though, it's the safest approach. Wait until the student has calmed down to say anything. Never threaten a consequence or respond angrily.
  • Amelia Franz says:
    This case-study contrasts two classroom situations. In the first, a teacher responds angrily and threateningly to a students' refusal to complete an assignment. The child ends up throwing pencils and running out of the room. In the second, the teacher responds calmly, talks to the student privately, and prevents a meltdown. Unfortunately, I've witnessed teachers and subs over the years who could have defused a child's anger, but instead threw fuel on the fire.
  • Amelia Franz says:
    Godwin Higa, Principal at Cherokee Point Elementary School, explains in this video how his school handles student misbehavior with "trauma-informed" teaching. Rather than treating disruptive behavior as a discipline problem, they ask the children "What's happened to you?" Mr. Higa says that suspensions have dropped at his school.
  • edsource.org
    edsource.org

    Schools promoting 'trauma-informed' teaching to reach troubled students

    10 minute read
    Amelia Franz says:
    This article explains that some schools in CA are paying attention to research that shows how children's brains adapt to traumatic life experiences. Events that might cause no distress at all in some children cause "fight or flight" reactions in children who've been exposed to abuse and violence. Teachers in some districts are being trained to interact with traumatized students in ways that help, rather than harm.