Lower Elementary
English Language Arts

Using Pokemon to Build Literacy Skills

Pokemon in the classroom? Yes, this high-interest card game with its seemingly endless array of characters (actually 721, according to my son) can be used for phonics, reading, and writing instruction. Considering your students' interests and hobbies can engage even poorly-motivated students in learning those all-important early literacy skills.
A Collection By Amelia Franz
  • 9 Collection Items
  • 9 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Using Pokemon to Build Literacy Skills
  • edut.to
    edut.to

    Five Ideas for Using Pop Culture to Inspire Elementary Students

    5 minute read
    Amelia Franz says:
    A New Jersey teacher gives five examples of ways to incorporate pop culture into the elementary classroom. I liked the "action figure day" activity. He brings in his own action figures (some from his childhood), and students research to learn more about the history of the figure. They then create stories to "bring them to life."
  • bit.ly
    bit.ly

    Why Pop Culture has a Place in the Classroom

    5 minute read
    Amelia Franz says:
    This teacher blog post argues that using pop culture in the classroom will benefit students by increasing their engagement. The post doesn't specifically address Pokemon or any particular media creation. Instead, it gives an overall rationale for bringing our students' interests into lesson planning.
  • Amelia Franz says:
    I included this lesson plan, even though it is designed for fourth graders who can read well, but need help writing more descriptively. Students create cards starring their favorite monster/Pokemon, then use vivid language to describe the creature.
  • Amelia Franz says:
    This Pokemon page will be helpful for teachers unfamiliar with the intricacies of Pokemon. It explains Pokemon and how to play.
  • Amelia Franz says:
    Remember the classic card game, War? These Pokemon War cards can be downloaded from Teachers Pay Teachers for free. The game received high ratings and praise from several reviewers.
  • Amelia Franz says:
    Twelve different lessons/activities based on Pokemon are featured in this guide, along with links to other early literacy resources. I didn't find specific grade levels listed, but in my opinion, they would work best for kindergarten and first grade-level readers.
  • Amelia Franz says:
    This game is really well-designed, and would give your students practice in writing simple sentences. The player uploads an image onto the virtual "card," then types in replies to biographical questions about the character. The result is a trading card of whichever character or person they choose. This isn't specifically tied to Pokemon, but could be used with a historical figure, animal, or even the student.
  • Amelia Franz says:
    I love this idea! Students make their own Pokemon cards, with each card containing an illustration and short description of the Pokemon character. The second idea is great, too. Create a Pokemon User Guide by simply folding a few sheets of paper in half, then stapling them together. Obviously, your students wouldn't all have real Pokemon cards to attach to each page, but they could use illustrations, instead.
  • Amelia Franz says:
    This blog post by a retired teacher explains how she used Pokemon cards to teach phonics to a third-grader with a learning disability.