High School
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DIYing with Microcontrollers in the Classroom

The Maker movement is sweeping the nation and a renewed interest in DIY electronics has become popular with kids and adults. These resources will allow the adventurous educator to introduce students to the wonderful world of hardware. Synonymous with DIY electronics is the Arduino microcontroller, an affordable and accessible platform geared to non-technical people who want to do things with electronics.
A Collection By Billy McGrath
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DIYing with Microcontrollers in the Classroom
  • teachingchannel.org
    teachingchannel.org

    Developing Student Agency Through Design

    5 minute read
    Billy McGrath says:
    This article explains some of the motivations and advantages of incorporating "making" in the classroom. This is the second of a six part series (in progress at the time of this writing). Teachers who are doing or want to get started with DIYing will find this background on the approach written by experienced teachers to be enlightening.
  • Billy McGrath says:
    This is a nice showcase of Arduino projects that I like to show to get students excited about working with microcontrollers. I especially like the ending, "What's yours?"
  • Using Servos

    Website
    instructables.com
    instructables.com
    Billy McGrath says:
    Servo motors are commonly controlled by microcontrollers and this post introduces them with a nice practical example. The inclusion of photos and code is nice, but what I like most is that the example uses buttons to control the motor, allowing students to interact with their project.
  • Billy McGrath says:
    This lesson plan doesn't actually require any hardware or directly involve a microcontroller. Instead it focuses on the thought process of breaking down one problem into smaller steps. It revolves around sensors and data collection, which are both integral parts of learning to use a microcontroller.
  • Billy McGrath says:
    Everyone has to start somewhere, and this lesson is the starting point for most people who are new to microcontrollers. Learning to make an LED blink on and off is a simple first program that comes with the simple gratification of watching your code do something in the real world. There are many variations of this tutorial, but this is my go-to.
  • Billy McGrath says:
    This tutorial covers the basics of analog to digital conversion as it applies to microcontrollers like the Arduino. The tutorial is concise and has useful examples without becoming overly involved. It is perfect for high school students who are new to electronics design. In addition Sparkfun is a good website to purchase the electronic components needed for many projects. I highly recommend their kits as a starting point for exploring any new project or technology.
  • Billy McGrath says:
    This is one of the most helpful examples I have ever come across. In this video they demonstrate the basic principles of Mosfet operation but more importantly provide an example where they pull numbers off the datasheet and plug them in to simple, albeit useful design equations. With this video you can bypass (or relearn) that Mosfet chapter in your Electronics 101 textbook.
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