Middle School
Cross-Curricular

Building Rapport by Supporting Students' Extra Activities

A quick story of why this is so vital. When I was teaching at a middle school, I started in December and there were already two teachers that left that same semester. I was warned to look out for one student but when I took an interest and went to her softball practice and game, she changed dramatically. This tangibly exhibits how when you don't instantly give up on students and support them, positive rapport can be built.
  • 5 Collection Items
  • 5 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Building Rapport by Supporting Students' Extra Activities
  • Bridget Griggs, Ph. D. says:
    This article is phenomenal as it succinctly and clearly lays out the pros and cons of participating actively in the students' extracurricular activities and also the impact that it has on the teacher-student relationship. We as teachers want to have a rapport with our students that creates a classroom environment conducive to learning but we need to ensure we understand the delicate balance that must be adhered to.
  • Bridget Griggs, Ph. D. says:
    When I was teaching, I would always keep the following saying in my mind: People don't care how much you know until they know how much you care. I have taught with teachers like what Rita is describing. As Rita quickly rebutted, this is quite the oxymoron as you need to have a love of children and have a genuine interest in their welfare in order to be the most effective educator possible. I do believe you will take a lot away from this video.
  • Bridget Griggs, Ph. D. says:
    When I began teaching, many teachers would advise that I needed to start the year off firm and if everything was flowing well after a while, I could gradually ease up. They did not, however, in this discussion teach me how to gain rapport with the students. Am I their friend or enemy or just something in between? This discussion between teachers will be great to view as it delves into this thought and takes thoughts of other teachers who have the same questions.
  • Bridget Griggs, Ph. D. says:
    When I was teaching in the middle and high schools, I would have the students to complete a learning and interest inventory. Why you may ask? I am glad to tell you. In order to ensure that my teaching is relevant and meaningful, I needed to simultaneously incorporate some of their interests into the lesson plans. This gains their attention and gives them a better opportunity to be academically successful. This administrative feedback gives additional strategies for inclusion.
  • New Teachers and Building Rapport

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    Bridget Griggs, Ph. D. says:
    I completely agree with this image. As a new teacher, you are walking a high and tight rope to ensure that you are being an effective educator but also not being too friendly with the students. So does that mean you have to be, well, mean? Not at all. It does take time to gain rapport and the students have to feel safe and comfortable around you but once this delicate balance is met, that's when the magic happens.
BloomBoard SparkOther Cross-Curricular
BloomBoard Asks:What opportunities do you have to support your students in the extracurricular activities they participate with?