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Helicopter Parents

Every teacher knows exactly the type of parent I am talking about when I use the term "helicopter parent." Although it can be assumed that these parents are loving parents who are simply looking out for their child's best interest, they seems to be missing a grasp of reality, and more importantly, boundaries. These resources will talk about the idea of a helicopter parent and address ways to have a healthy relationship with them!
A Collection By Caitlin Unger
  • 8 Collection Items
  • 8 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Helicopter Parents
  • thejournal.com
    thejournal.com

    7 Free Apps for Keeping Parents and Teachers Connected

    10 minute read
    Caitlin Unger says:
    In the age of technology, it can be assumed that part of the reason parents can become overbearing is because of the information they can receive so instantaneously. It is a lot easier to confront a teacher via text than to set up an appointment to meet in person. Although there can be appropriate times for text messages, this type of contact between parents and teachers should be eliminated.
  • Caitlin Unger says:
    Although there are those stereotypical parents who really do smother their children, there are parents just like this one, who did not choose to take on this role but have to due to their child's circumstances. Excellent read!
  • smartclassroommanagement.com
    smartclassroommanagement.com

    8 Ways to Eliminate Parent Complaints Forever

    10 minute read
    Caitlin Unger says:
    This article shed a positive light to the parent/teacher relationship but providing many antecedent strategies to ensure a strong, positive bond between families and educators. These are some great tips!
  • schoolcounselor.org
    schoolcounselor.org

    Three Steps for Dealing With Helicopter Parents

    10 minute read
    Caitlin Unger says:
    Although this blog article is designed for school counselors, the three tips she provides are actually great for all educators. What I specifically enjoyed about this article was it is important as educators to remind the parents that they are not our opponent and we too have their child's best interest at heart.
  • freespiritpublishingblog.com
    freespiritpublishingblog.com

    The Do's and Don'ts of Dealing with Helicopter Parents

    15 minute read
    Caitlin Unger says:
    One particular thing I liked about this article that I had not seen in others is that it does have a focus on parent intentions. While it is easy to stereotype and assume parental motives, doing that can and will add fuel to the fire.
  • smh.com.au
    smh.com.au

    Teachers Taught to Ground Helicopters

    10 minute read
    Caitlin Unger says:
    Although this article was from a school system in Australia, I think we are at the point in the US where this should be a nation wide policy for each school system as well! This article talks about how specific schools hold workshops and/or meetings to ensure the entire staff not only feels comfortable dealing with helicopter parents, but also knows the administration has their backs, so to speak, by laying out specific guidelines regarding parent/teacher communication.
  • cnn.com
    cnn.com

    What Teachers Really Want to Tell Parents

    10 minute read
    Caitlin Unger says:
    As a teacher, I love parental involvement and think that a strong student-teacher-parent relationship is the recipe for a solid foundation of learning. However, this article really hit home for me as it described many of the "lunchroom" conversations in an appropriate manner. I was shocked to read that 4.5 years is the current average of time teachers spend in this profession, and that the majority leave because of parental issues.
  • scholastic.com
    scholastic.com

    5 Easy Fixes for Dealing with Problem Parents

    10 minute read
    Caitlin Unger says:
    This article by Megan from Scholastic discusses the many types of "problematic" parents including: the helicopter parent, the know-it-all, the best friend, the demander, the absent parent. She also includes professional advice on how to satisfy each parent with the child's best interest at highest consideration.
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