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Cross-Curricular

Every Subject Area Teacher Can Teach Reading

It’s likely that at least six or seven students in your classroom are struggling to read. These are the students who likely will drop out of school, becoming part of America’s functionally illiterate. Who’s responsible for teaching these kids how to read? The reading teacher? Someone else? What about you — how can you help combat illiteracy? This collection offers strategies for the content teacher who never learned how to be a reading teacher but now find him or herself in that position.
A Collection By Debi Christensen
  • 8 Collection Items
  • 8 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Every Subject Area Teacher Can Teach Reading
  • Debi Christensen says:
    Although you may find it odd that this book is included with a collection about teaching reading across the curriculum, it’s an important reaffirmation that you are teaching for all the right reasons. This book may help you fall back in love with teaching, regardless of whether you have to teach reading skills along with your content. It may be the one thing that boosts your energy and your confidence.
  • ascd.org
    ascd.org

    The Importance of High School Electives

    6 minute read
    Debi Christensen says:
    You’re not a reading teacher, but you want to help support your colleagues with masterful reading strategies in your classroom? Here are four initiatives you can begin right away in any high school (or middle school) electives class.
  • Debi Christensen says:
    This DVD series on teaching reading across the curriculum provides every content teacher with a rationale for teaching reading skills regardless of the subject, and it also explains best practices from the field. The package includes articles that support the information in the DVD, making this resource an excellent tool for professional development.
  • Debi Christensen says:
    There’s an old saying that in elementary you learn to read, and in secondary, you read to learn. Where does this leave your students? This video explains why reading comprehension is incomplete without content knowledge. Background knowledge gives poor readers an edge but doesn’t improve reading skills. Good reading skills come from learning decoding and background knowledge.
  • sedl.org
    sedl.org

    Making Every Teacher a Reading Teacher

    7 minute read
    Debi Christensen says:
    Changing the school culture can be a formidable task, especially when it comes to teaching reading — especially if your are the math or science teacher. But with at least one-fourth of the adults in the United States identified as functionally illiterate, it’s time that every teacher step up and help out to improve students’ reading skills. This articles discusses the pitfalls and the benefits.
  • essentiallearningproducts.com
    essentiallearningproducts.com

    Every Teacher is a Teacher of Reading

    5 minute read
    Debi Christensen says:
    If you are looking for quick tips to improve your students’ reading skills regardless of the subject you teach, this article tells you what to incorporate into your teaching and assignments. Your students need your help sounding out unknown words, using word attack skills, building fluency and creating comprehension.
  • ascd.org
    ascd.org

    Reading Comprehension Strategies for English Language Learners

    Article
    Debi Christensen says:
    “But I’m not a reading teacher,” you say? Not to worry. This book will take you through the steps your students need to access your content with reading skills. Although these are skills for ESL learners, you’ll find the simple approach works well with a variety of student populations with special needs.
  • Debi Christensen says:
    You don’t need a program to teach students how to read. You need a toolkit that works with any subject, and this particular toolkit works with a lesson frame designed to work at any grade level and with any subject. This is scaffolding at its best.
BloomBoard SparkOther Cross-Curricular
BloomBoard Asks:What do you do in your classroom to teach reading, regardless of your subject?