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Inspirational Kids That Know What It Takes to Be Resilient

Remarkable stories and supporting research shine a light on the popular topic of resiliency. When you want to take a break from education but can’t stop thinking about the kids you teach, get a look at the lives some of your students may be living when they leave school — and the safety of your classroom — at the end of the day. Their inspirational stories may make you mad or have you crying, laughing and cheering them on! Your students may love some of these books as well.
A Collection By Debi Christensen
  • 8 Collection Items
  • 8 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Inspirational Kids That Know What It Takes to Be Resilient
  • Debi Christensen says:
    Not every child in your classroom has the kind of life experiences that help them thrive. A new classroom or school, bullying, and even changes in family dynamics are stressors for kids. This article presents advice that you can use immediately to help kids during difficult times in their lives. It also addresses the unique needs of elementary, middle school and high school children.
  • Debi Christensen says:
    Zaretta Hammond shows you how to take lessons learned from neuroscience and create cultural relevance and responsiveness to close the gap at-risk students experience in learning. While this book is not a how-to in the sense of a template that will work every time in every situation, it does offer the reader insight and ideas that can be adapted for your classroom.
  • Raising Resilient Kids

    Website
    raisingresilientkids.com
    raisingresilientkids.com
    Debi Christensen says:
    George Bonanno has devoted 20 years to researching what it means to be resilient in the face of stress. He combines quantitative research and common sense advice when talking about overcoming potentially traumatic life events (PTEs). Most kids and adults are likely to have at least one PTE (death in the family, divorce, accident, etc.) in their lives, but not everyone has difficulty in developing resilience.
  • Debi Christensen says:
    Living in an unpredictably violent home meant that Chip St. Claire would have to survive incredible odds to become the adult he is today. Everything in Chip’s world was lie: the man he called Dad was a child murderer, and even Chip’s identity was a lie. Yet Chip overcame the hurdles he faced, becoming an inspiration to others.
  • Debi Christensen says:
    Growing up poor in a dysfunctional family was made all the worse thanks to nomadic parents who preferred living a life of nonconformity. Jeanette Walls know she and her siblings led a much different lifestyle than that of their peers at school; sometimes their adventures were a curse and sometimes a blessing. This story tells about their resilience fas they became adults.
  • Debi Christensen says:
    When Lizzie Vasquez was called the world’s ugliest woman at the age of 17, she turned on the bullies who attacked her appearance. Her rare genetic disease makes it impossible for her to gain weight, but she has discovered immense possibility in speaking professionally to audiences about what it takes to overcome adversity and stop bullies.
  • Debi Christensen says:
    Kalisha Buckhanon writes about two teenage lovers, one incarcerated and one in the “free” as they struggle to maintain a relationship with each other through letters and visits. Although this tale is fiction, it is told so authentically that you will believe the characters, their environment and everything that happens during the decade that this tale spans.
  • Debi Christensen says:
    At some point,in your teaching career, you’ll have students who are cared for and monitored by Family Protective Services. Share this book with kids headed into foster care and with the foster parents who will care for them; Jennifer Wilgocki explains the roles of everyone in the system. Use it as a conversation starter with kids who may find talking about their situation difficult.
BloomBoard SparkOther Cross-Curricular
BloomBoard Asks:Most kids go home at the end of the school day to a loving and supportive home. What secrets are some of the other kids in your class afraid to tell you about?