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English Language Arts

Reading the Bard: Top Resources for Teaching Shakespeare

The works of Shakespeare are some of the most quoted, most referenced and inspirational works in the world. It’s easy to see why; his stories are universal and timeless, appealing to diverse cultures and ages. Shakespeare and the Elizabethan age is one of my favorite topics to teach, especially to younger students. Yes, they CAN do Shakespeare! When the play’s the thing, these are your go-to resources for teaching Shakespeare.
A Collection By Debi Christensen
  • 8 Collection Items
  • 8 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Reading the Bard: Top Resources for Teaching Shakespeare
  • Debi Christensen says:
    Reading and performing Shakespeare just got way easier with No Fear Shakespeare. Students can tackle any scene or soliloquy easily because the original and modern text has been laid out side by side.I love this site for differentiating instruction for my readers. Best of all, it’s user-friendly.
  • Debi Christensen says:
    Shakespeare is for everyone, including kids, and the Folger Shakespeare Library helps you teach his work, life and times and a few other fun facts that kids enjoy learning about. This is my first stop when developing background-building lessons.
  • Debi Christensen says:
    There’s more than one way to read a play! Teaching Shakespeare has plenty of inspirational ideas for teaching Shakespeare, from using realia to viewing films and performances. Add Shakespearian themes, contexts and genres, and you have wealth of information at the click of a mouse.
  • Debi Christensen says:
    The National Endowment for the Arts produced this video combining the talents of famous actors and kids as they recite lines of from Shakespeare’s plays and discuss honestly the impact learning Shakespeare has had on their lives. I love watching this over and over; it’s a pertinent reminder that art makes all the difference. You too may tear up when you listen to the St. Crispin Day speech from Henry V.
  • Debi Christensen says:
    Children in 4th - 6th grade can enjoy and understand Shakespeare's plays, too, even though there are some scenes you’d rather not address with young children. No sweat! This website makes half a dozen Shakespearean plays accessible to younger students. These tales, available in e-reader formats, are written in prose form. Hoping your kids will write sonnets? There are lessons on how to write a Shakespearean sonnet.
  • Debi Christensen says:
    These are Shakespearean plays in graphic novel format! I’ve found that students love the glossy pages full of vibrant colors and detailed drawings, and the Saddleback readers make Shakespeare more accessible.Use these as an additional or reading resource for kids while working with texts from No Fear Shakespeare, or permit lower level readers to use these exclusively.
  • bloggingshakespeare.com
    bloggingshakespeare.com

    Why Shakespeare Still Matters

    6 minute read
    Debi Christensen says:
    No other writer from history understood the human condition as well, perhaps, as Shakespeare. This blog post discusses how the raw and honest emotions form Shakespeare’s plays can still teach today, especially when juxtaposed against current events in the world. As a bonus, this site is full of other related blogs and videos.
  • wsj.com
    wsj.com

    Teaching Shakespeare Straight Up

    6 minute read
    Debi Christensen says:
    At some point, parents, school board members, students and even your colleagues may ask you what value you see in teaching Shakespeare.This article thoughtfully shows how teaching these works for their own sake, and letting students create their own interpretations and respecting the judgments they have about the plays.
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BloomBoard Asks:How can you adapt the plays of Shakespeare to the reading level of your students?