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The Best Special Education Advice You’ll Ever Get

It’s too easy to walk into your classroom, close the door to teach and feel like you are all alone. You are not alone, especially when it comes to teaching in special education. There are resources to help you and organizations that will make you feel as though you are part of an extended family. Rely on them for the best spec ed advice ever.
A Collection By Debi Christensen
  • 8 Collection Items
  • 8 Collection Items
  • Discussion
The Best Special Education Advice You’ll Ever Get
  • Debi Christensen says:
    Knowing what to do and finding the right materials for your special education students can seem like a daunting task, but it doesn’t have to be. Join NASET for the professional development benefits, and you’ll stay because of the supportive community of educators.
  • Debi Christensen says:
    Challenges with perception and understanding may qualify students for additional classroom support, and this site is a resource for finding out more about learning disabilities. Educators and parents may find the topics for which they need additional information, and there are plenty of supportive articles.
  • Debi Christensen says:
    Telling students what you want them to know is not teaching. Getting students involved in learning by using multiple modalities is more likely to help them learn new concepts. This site offers a plethora of excellent research-based strategies gathered in one place and organized by discipline and grade levels. You’ll find explanations and picture examples of the strategies so that you know exactly what to do. No more searching and searching — it’s all right here.
  • wrightslaw.com
    wrightslaw.com

    Special Education: NOT the Resource Room

    6 minute read
    Debi Christensen says:
    Many preeminent attorneys charge for access to the information on their websites, but Wrightslaw gives you access to the topics you have questions about, including everything from abuse to transition. As frequently as special education law seems to change, this is a great advocacy resource to come back to again and again.
  • Debi Christensen says:
    Special education is full of unique terms and acronyms, and “spec ed speak” can be just as difficult to navigate as the inner city freeway system. This site takes everything special ed and explains it without the jargon, beginning with choosing special education as a career niche and including current education trends to use in your classroom.
  • IEP Pal

    Website
    ieppal.com
    ieppal.com
    Debi Christensen says:
    Special education data collection can be just as overwhelming as the paperwork that goes into the meeting, but this app makes collection easy. Best of all, the software program replaces those cumbersome folders because all of the data is stored at your fingertips. This is definitely a timesaver!
  • dyslexia.com
    dyslexia.com

    Test for Dyslexia: 37 Common Traits

    5 minute read
    Debi Christensen says:
    If a student of yours is having difficulty reading, how do you know where to begin? This checklist may offer some insight. Certainly not all special educations students have dyslexia, nor are all dyslexic students in special education, but this well-written list may help you identify what your next steps should be in getting your students the help they need in reading.
  • Debi Christensen says:
    Do you ever get the feeling that you’ll never be able to pay off your student loans? Help may be closer than you think if you teach special education. The Federal Student Aid office is part of the USDE; find out if you are eligible for college loan forgiveness or cancellation.
BloomBoard SparkOther Cross-Curricular
BloomBoard Asks:Where can you turn for help when you have students with special needs in your classroom?