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The Human Brain and Learning

No other organ affects a child’s ability to learn like the human brain. Evolving until a child reaches his mid-twenties, brain’s needs can be met at every stage in life, if you know what strategies to use and when to use them.
A Collection By Debi Christensen
  • 8 Collection Items
  • 8 Collection Items
  • Discussion
The Human Brain and Learning
  • brainconnection.brainhq.com
    brainconnection.brainhq.com

    What is "Brain-Based Learning"?

    7 minute read
    Debi Christensen says:
    This article is a well-written summary of the extensive brain-based learning theory researched by Caine and Caine. I find the twelve practical uses of brain theory to be a good reminder of what I should be doing with instructional approaches and the three conditions for learning an excellent reminder for crafting lessons (I printed the six bolded words and taped them to my monitor).
  • teachhub.com
    teachhub.com

    Brain-Based Learning Strategies: Hold Students' Attention With a Radish

    6 minute read
    Debi Christensen says:
    You can implement basic strategies of brain-based learning with little advance preparation if you use the tips in this article. I’ve seen many of them make a big difference for children, but the reminder I love is “calm the nervous fox.”
  • Debi Christensen says:
    Much of teenage behavior can be explained by the stages of brain development. There’s a reason teens act and react the way they do — we’ve been blaming it on puberty all this time, but the brain is to blame, too.
  • Debi Christensen says:
    What you know about the human brain can benefit the students in the classroom. This book explores how developing brains rely on diet, exercise, social and emotional connections, and how to use this information for instruction in the classroom.
  • Debi Christensen says:
    Thomas Armstrong reveals how to incorporate multiple intelligences in your classroom instruction, and then he goes a step farther. He shows you how to assess them. Although this is an “old” read, it serves as a foundational piece for transforming cookie-cutter style instruction in the classroom. Is anyone even doing that anymore?
  • Debi Christensen says:
    Why wouldn’t you teach with the brain in mind? The only reason not to use brain-based learning strategies is perhaps because you didn’t know about them. This book offers simple tips to the kind of learning environment that will stimulate the brain and engage the student. Best of all, these strategies actually reduce off-task behaviors, allowing you more time for instruction.
  • Debi Christensen says:
    If you're still doing it, stop talking about the triune brain. What scientists know about the brain has come a long way, and you can use brain theory in your classroom for teaching, creating motivation,distributing rewards and more. The book is an easy reference for those times when you want to refer to something quickly and put it to immediate use.
  • harvardmagazine.com
    harvardmagazine.com

    The Teen Brain

    6 minute read
    Debi Christensen says:
    The teenage brain is like no other. It’s not an older version of a six year old nor is it a youthful adult; it’s an anomaly all unto itself. The teenage brain also presents one of the last times the brain pushes for development, and as a result, creates dichotomies between desire and action. Sure teens want to help you with some chores, they say, as they sprawl across your sofa, unable to move. Turns out that there’s a brain-based reason for this!
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BloomBoard Asks:What does current brain theory say about instruction in your classroom?